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Sanguine BioSciences Signs Agreements with More than 200 Partners to Enable Efficient Personalized Medicine Research

Sanguine BioSciences, a biotechnology company enabling personalized medicine research, today announced that it has signed commercial agreements with, and received orders from, more than 200 biomedical researchers at academic, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, to enable more efficient personalized medicine research. Ongoing agreements are in place with a wide range of organizations, ranging from startups, such as Inhibrx, to contract research organizations, such as Applied Immunology, and major drug developers, such as Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

Sanguine directly engages patients diagnosed with severe and chronic diseases to collect and de-identify biospecimen, medical history and other data that can be used in biomarker research. Traditional methods are to obtain biospecimen through hospitals, but this process can result in months of delays as the focus for physicians and staff is on diagnosis and treatment, not facilitating research efforts. By engaging patients directly, Sanguine can meet the needs of researchers and offer timely turnaround of biospecimen and medical data with diverse ranges for age, race, disease state, gender and treatments underway. The patient engagement tactics used by the company have led to a 95 percent retention rate, which also allow for follow-up draws for longitudinal studies.

“In a very short amount of time, and with only recently hiring our first few sales executives, our company has established agreements with ten of the largest drug developers in the world and continues to see high demand for our offering,” said Brian Neman, founder and chief executive officer of Sanguine. “Researchers have specific needs to complete studies in early discovery work, sometimes run with blood samples drawn the same day and other times requiring follow-up draws on exact time schedules, but traditional strategies to obtain these add months to the timeline. Our commitment to patient engagement, transparency and advocacy removes much of this wait time – accelerating the research and increasing the efficiency of the process overall.”

Sanguine is able to meet, review disclosures and collect blood samples in a patient’s home with its own phlebotomists in multiple major U.S. cities. Patients are also able to track how their de-identified biospecimen and data are used through the donor web portal. The company is able to collect and process blood from patients with any disease and has already built large libraries in multiple chronic and severe conditions, including Huntington’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and others.

In order to maintain appropriate confidentiality, all samples are de-identified immediately upon collection. Sanguine maintains and reviews internal ethical guidelines for the procedures under high scrutiny from an independent review board.

Source: PR Newswire

Sanguine BioSciences Announces Distribution Partnership with AMS Biotechnology

Sanguine BioSciences, a biotechnology company enabling personalized medicine research, today announced a distribution partnership with AMS Biotechnology (AMSBIO) to make its products and services available to researchers in Europe.

Sanguine collects and de-identifies biospecimen, medical history and other data from patients diagnosed with severe and chronic diseases for use in biomarker research. Researchers traditionally obtain biospecimen through hospitals, but this process often proves inefficient as the focus for physicians and staff is on diagnosis and treatment, not facilitating research efforts. By connecting directly with patients, Sanguine can meet the needs of researchers and offer timely turnaround of biospecimen and medical data with diverse ranges for age, race, disease state, gender and treatments underway. The patient engagement tactics used by the company have led to a 95 percent retention rate, which also allow for follow-up draws for longitudinal studies.

“There is no denying that personalized medicine has become a significant area of interest for drug discovery, but there exists a gap between researchers who require biospecimen respective medical data, and patients who want to be a part of research efforts,” said Brian Neman, founder and chief executive officer of Sanguine. “We have engaged hundreds of patient subjects, and built a library of specimen and data that can effectively bridge this gap. We look forward to partnering with AMSBIO to make this service accessible to researchers around the world working in different therapeutic areas.”

Added Phillip Pridham-Field of AMSBIO, “Sanguine’s patient retention efforts allow researchers to collect the data they need with better turnaround time and with the potential for longitudinal studies. We believe they will be an excellent addition to our current product offerings for researchers in life sciences.”

Sanguine is able to meet, review disclosures and collect blood samples in a patient’s home with its own phlebotomists in multiple major U.S. cities. Patients are also able to track how their de-identified biospecimen and data are used through the donor web-portal. The company is able to collect and process blood from patients with any disease and has already built large libraries in multiple chronic and severe conditions, including Huntington’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and others.
In order to maintain appropriate confidentiality, all samples are de-identified immediately upon collection. Sanguine maintains and reviews internal ethical guidelines for the procedures under high scrutiny from an independent review board.

Source: PR Newswire

Kantar Health Launches CancerMPact Biomarker Analysis

Kantar Health, a leading global healthcare consulting firm, today announced the availability of CancerMPact® Biomarker Analysis, a global offer that examines biomarker segmentation in the current and evolving oncology landscape. The analysis is based on a thorough review of literature and recently published data covering the following biomarkers:

  • BRAF (melanoma)
  • EGFR (non-small lung cancer)
  • EML4-ALK (non-small cell lung cancer)
  • KRAS (colorectal cancer)
  • TNBC (breast cancer)

CancerMPact Biomarker Analysis helps clients identify the percentage of cancer patients with a specific biomarker; ascertain variations in biomarker prevalence by race, ethnicity or geography; determine which information to use to inform forecasting and market sizing; and pinpoint which patient segments are available for targeted therapies and clinical trials. Through this new offer, pharma companies are able to better understand which patient subpopulations are candidates for unique treatment options in this complex therapeutic area.

“The era of ‘personalized’ medicine has arrived, and while physicians and patients are ready to embrace it, many factors need to be considered by a manufacturer to accurately evaluate their market opportunities,” Kantar Health Vice President David Robinson said. “We estimate that 17 to 20 percent of oncology patients are currently eligible for personalized care due to either biomarkers or histology-based treatments. This number will grow in the near future as more biomarkers are validated and new patient subpopulations are identified as being appropriate for novel targeted therapeutics.”

CancerMPact Biomarker Analysis is produced by the same oncology experts as CancerMPact®, which has become an invaluable oncology decision support tool for market analysis, strategic planning and identification of commercial opportunities in the U.S., Western Europe, Japan and China. This tool, composed of web-based integrated modules, includes Treatment Practices and Evolution (Treatment Architecture and Future Trends and Insights), Patient Metrics, and Monthly Drugs and Regimens.

Alzheimer’s Markers Predict Start of Mental Decline

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have helped identify many of the biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease that could potentially predict which patients will develop the disorder later in life. Now, studying spinal fluid samples and health data from 201 research participants at the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, the researchers have shown the markers are accurate predictors of Alzheimer’s years before symptoms develop.

“We wanted to see if one marker was better than the other in predicting which of our participants would get cognitive impairment and when they would get it,” said Catherine Roe, PhD, research assistant professor of neurology. “We found no differences in the accuracy of the biomarkers.”

The study, supported in part by the National Institute on Aging, appears in Neurology.

The researchers evaluated markers such as the buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, newly visible thanks to an imaging agent developed in the last decade; levels of various proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, such as the amyloid fragments that are the principal ingredient of brain plaques; and the ratios of one protein to another in the cerebrospinal fluid, such as different forms of the brain cell structural protein tau.

The markers were studied in volunteers whose ages ranged from 45 to 88. On average, the data available on study participants spanned four years, with the longest recorded over 7.5 years.

The researchers found that all of the markers were equally good at identifying subjects who were likely to develop cognitive problems and at predicting how soon they would become noticeably impaired.

Next, the scientists paired the biomarkers data with demographic information, testing to see if sex, age, race, education and other factors could improve their predictions.

“Sex, age and race all helped to predict who would develop cognitive impairment,” Roe said. “Older participants, men and African Americans were more likely to become cognitively impaired than those who were younger, female and Caucasian.”

Roe described the findings as providing more evidence that scientists can detect Alzheimer’s disease years before memory loss and cognitive decline become apparent.

“We can better predict future cognitive impairment when we combine biomarkers with patient characteristics,” she said. “Knowing how accurate biomarkers are is important if we are going to some day be able to treat Alzheimer’s before symptoms and slow or prevent the disease.”

Clinical trials are already underway at Washington University and elsewhere to determine if treatments prior to symptoms can prevent or delay inherited forms of Alzheimer’s disease. Reliable biomarkers for Alzheimer’s should one day make it possible to test the most successful treatments in the much more common sporadic forms of Alzheimer’s.

Study: Amyloid imaging and CSF biomarkers in predicting cognitive impairment up to 7.5 years later

Source: EurekAlert!

A Simpler Way to Predict Heart Failure

The most widely used models for predicting heart failure rely on a complex combination of lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular risk factor information. But recently Vijay Nambi, M.D., Ph.D., and Christie Ballantyne, M.D., of The Methodist Hospital Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Baylor College of Medicine presented new data that show two biomarkers can improve heart failure risk prediction as part of a simpler model. Their presentation was part of the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2012 in Los Angeles.