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Breakthrough Case Study Highlights New Biomarker for Cancer and Inflammation

A groundbreaking peer reviewed case report by Dr. Isaac Eliaz, M.D. of Amitabha Medical Clinic, demonstrates for the first time the clinical use of novel biomarker galectin-3 to assess cancer progression and inflammation. The case study titled, “The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities,” was published in the July 2013 issue of Case Reports in Oncology. This report is the first of its kind to expand the diagnostic and prognostic applications of the galectin-3 blood serum test, introducing an important clinical tool to assess risk and progression of metastatic cancer and inflammatory diseases.

In 2011, the galectin-3 blood test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the screening and prognosis of congestive heart failure and cardiovascular disease. Approval was granted after an extensive body of published data, including long-term population studies, demonstrated the active role of elevated galectin-3 in cardiovascular conditions, fibrosis and early mortality. However, a rapidly expanding field of published galectin-3 research also highlights the significance of this rogue molecule as a novel biomarker that is both an active culprit as well as a byproduct of numerous inflammatory and malignant cellular processes beyond cardiovascular disease.

An expert on galectin-3, Dr. Eliaz applies the data obtained in this case study to shed further light on excess galectin-3’s mechanisms of action, specifically inflammatory response to injury and cancer progression. In this report, Dr. Eliaz presents the first published case documenting the clinical use of galectin-3 to monitor cancer progression and treatment response, as well as inflammatory conditions. These findings point to an expanded clinical model using galectin-3 testing in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of numerous chronic, inflammatory diseases.

Unlike biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), which only indicate the presence of inflammation, galactin-3 is shown to play a direct role in initiating disease progression. It is a protein normally present in the body at low concentrations, where it is involved in numerous functions including cell growth and communication. At elevated levels, however, galectin-3 fuels numerous pathologic processes including chronic inflammation and the progression of inflammation to fibrosis; cancer cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Elevated galectin-3 also allows cancer cells to evade immune response. Research demonstrates elevated galectin-3 levels in patients with melanoma, lung, breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and head and neck cancers as well as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and others. Galectin-3 levels are also found to be higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized tumors.

Dr. Eliaz states, “This new case report and significant clinical observation supports the need for further research on the role of galectin-3. The galectin-3 test could well become one of our most important clinical tools in assessing and monitoring a wide range of conditions beyond cardiovascular disease, including metastatic cancer and inflammatory conditions.”

Study: The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities. [Case Reports in Oncology]

Source: PR Newswire

Northwestern Medicine Enrolls First Participant in Midwest for Research Study of Personalized Vaccine for Aggressive Brain Tumors

Northwestern Medicine® recently joined a landmark clinical trial to investigate if a vaccine made from a patient’s own brain tumor is effective in slowing tumor progression and extending survival. The randomized phase II trial will study how well giving the study vaccine with or without Avastin (bevacizumab) works in treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study is the largest randomized brain tumor vaccine trial ever funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and is chaired by Andrew T. Parsa, MD, PhD, who joined Northwestern Memorial Hospital in July as the new chair of neurological surgery. The first participant in the Midwest, and only third in the country, was enrolled in the trial last week at Northwestern Memorial.

The trial will enroll more than 200 participants with recurrent glioblastoma that can be surgically removed. Following the participant’s surgery, the tumor is sent to an industry collaborator Agenus Inc., where the participant’s specific personalized vaccine, designated as HSPPC-96, is created. The vaccine is unique to the individual participant and is engineered to trigger an immune system response to kill tumor cells that may remain following surgery.

“This is truly personalized medicine where the patient’s own tumor is being used to help fight their cancer,” said Parsa, who is also the Michael J. Marchese Professor and chair of the department of neurological surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a member of the of Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University and part of the Northwestern Brain Tumor Institute. “The vaccine provokes a tumor-specific immune response that is specific to that patient. The T cells, which are the part of the immune system that fights disease, tracks down the cancer cells and kills them.”

Parsa launched this area of research in 2006 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Previous phases of this research have returned promising results finding that the vaccine extended survival for participants with glioblastoma when compared to standard therapies. In this next phase, researchers are seeking to understand if the vaccine is safe and more effective when given with Avastin, a drug that is known to shrink brain tumors and is a standard therapy for recurrent glioblastoma. Trial participants will be randomized to either receive the vaccine alone, concurrently with Avastin or Avastin only. Jeffrey Raizer, MD, co-director of the Northwestern Brain Tumor Institute (NBTI), is the principal investigator for the trial at Northwestern.

“This vaccine therapy has the potential to extend the lives of patients who often have limited options when their tumor returns,” said Raizer, medical director of neuro-oncology at Northwestern Memorial, associate professor of neurology at the Feinberg School and a member of the Lurie Cancer Center. “Previous results indicate that we may be able to extend survival longer by combining the therapy with other drugs, such as Avastin, that may boost the immune response of the vaccine.”

Each year, 17,000 Americans are diagnosed with glioblastoma, a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer. This type of tumor is often resistant to standard therapies and median survival is approximately 15 months from the point of first diagnosis.

“This research does not present a cure for brain tumors, but instead a potential way to convert the cancer into a chronic disease – something comparable to diabetes that you may be able to live with and control with medication,” said Parsa.

A successful trial could lead to the vaccine potentially being approved to treat recurrent brain tumors, making it one of only a few approved therapeutic cancer vaccines.

“Vaccine therapy is rapidly emerging as a potential treatment for many types of cancers and we’re proud that Northwestern is part of this exciting research,” said Steven T. Rosen, MD, director of the Lurie Cancer Center, director of cancer programs at Northwestern Memorial, and Genevieve E. Teuton Professor of Medicine at the Feinberg School. “This field of research has the potential to offer safer and less toxic cancer therapies that can be personalized to each individual patient.”

The study is sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (ALLIANCE), a cooperative group of the NCI, and the vaccine is being developed by Agenus Inc. Parsa has not received any financial support or travel expense from the company.

To learn more about the clinical trial, call 312-695-2047 or email kskirnyk@nmff.org. Enrollment criteria can be viewed on the Lurie Cancer Center website.

Northwestern’s neurology and neurological surgery program is ranked as 7th in the country on the U.S. News & World Report 2013-14 Best Hospitals specialty rankings and 1st in Chicago. This is the seventh consecutive year that Northwestern is the highest ranked neurological program in Illinois and Chicago. The departments of neurology and neurological surgery provide treatment for a full range of neurological disorders and offer patients the latest and most sophisticated treatment and surgical options. Our neurologists and neurosurgeons are actively engaged in clinical research to advance new therapies and uncover the causes and cures of neurological diseases.

Source: PR Newswire

Hyperion Medical Introduces the Sudoscan

Hyperion Medical is recently announced the availability of the FDA approved SudoScan device to the medical community. The SudoScan device is a new solution for Sudorimetry, measuring of the sweat gland function as a biomarker for autonomic nervous system (ANS) function.

Breakthrough Case Study Highlights New Biomarker for Cancer and Inflammation

A groundbreaking peer reviewed case report by Dr. Isaac Eliaz, M.D. of Amitabha Medical Clinic, demonstrates for the first time the clinical use of novel biomarker galectin-3 to assess cancer progression and inflammation. The case study titled, “The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities,” was published in the July 2013 issue of Case Reports in Oncology. This report is the first of its kind to expand the diagnostic and prognostic applications of the galectin-3 blood serum test, introducing an important clinical tool to assess risk and progression of metastatic cancer and inflammatory diseases.

In 2011, the galectin-3 blood test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the screening and prognosis of congestive heart failure and cardiovascular disease. Approval was granted after an extensive body of published data, including long-term population studies, demonstrated the active role of elevated galectin-3 in cardiovascular conditions, fibrosis and early mortality. However, a rapidly expanding field of published galectin-3 research also highlights the significance of this rogue molecule as a novel biomarker that is both an active culprit as well as a byproduct of numerous inflammatory and malignant cellular processes beyond cardiovascular disease.

An expert on galectin-3, Dr. Eliaz applies the data obtained in this case study to shed further light on excess galectin-3’s mechanisms of action, specifically inflammatory response to injury and cancer progression. In this report, Dr. Eliaz presents the first published case documenting the clinical use of galectin-3 to monitor cancer progression and treatment response, as well as inflammatory conditions. These findings point to an expanded clinical model using galectin-3 testing in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of numerous chronic, inflammatory diseases.

Unlike biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), which only indicate the presence of inflammation, galactin-3 is shown to play a direct role in initiating disease progression. It is a protein normally present in the body at low concentrations, where it is involved in numerous functions including cell growth and communication. At elevated levels, however, galectin-3 fuels numerous pathologic processes including chronic inflammation and the progression of inflammation to fibrosis; cancer cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Elevated galectin-3 also allows cancer cells to evade immune response. Research demonstrates elevated galectin-3 levels in patients with melanoma, lung, breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and head and neck cancers as well as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and others. Galectin-3 levels are also found to be higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized tumors.

Dr. Eliaz states, “This new case report and significant clinical observation supports the need for further research on the role of galectin-3. The galectin-3 test could well become one of our most important clinical tools in assessing and monitoring a wide range of conditions beyond cardiovascular disease, including metastatic cancer and inflammatory conditions.”

Study: The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities [Case Reports in Oncology]

Source: PR Newswire

NEBA Health Earns Patent for Integration of NEBA Biomarker with Clinician’s ADHD Evaluation

NEBA Health, LLC recently announced that Dr. Steven M. Snyder, Research and Development Vice President, has earned US Patent 8,509,884. The patent protects a key aspect of the NEBA system: integrating the biomarker with a clinician’s workup for ADHD. “NEBA is not a standalone diagnostic,” said Dr. Snyder. “After the clinician’s ADHD evaluation, NEBA helps them determine if the symptoms are due to ADHD or if further testing is warranted.”

“Integrating the NEBA biomarker with a clinician’s initial diagnostic impression can bring a clinician’s diagnosis more in line with that of multidisciplinary team,” said Dr. Snyder. Research supports that compared to a clinician alone, a multidisciplinary team is better able to determine if ADHD-like symptoms are accounted for by another condition.

In order to diagnose ADHD, a clinician not only observes criteria regarding behavioral symptoms and impairment, but also must determine whether symptoms would be better accounted for by another condition. Because ADHD shares symptoms with other disorders, the diagnosis may be difficult. According to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 9.5% of all children and adolescents have an ADHD diagnosis. The ADHD diagnosis rate is increasing. CDC states that rates of ADHD diagnosis increased an average of 3% per year from 1997 to 2006 and an average of 5.5% per year from 2003 to 2007.

“In their ADHD evaluation, clinicians may be challenged in the current medical environment to determine the primary diagnosis when overlapping symptoms are present,” said Howard Merry, President of NEBA Health. “We are delighted that the USPTO has awarded Dr. Snyder the patent. It covers NEBA’s core technology, and it’s another validation point for the 7 years we spent developing and validating NEBA.”

Source: PR Newswire