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Piramal Imaging is Proud to Support Major New Research Study Assessing the Value of PET Scans in Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Diagnosis

Piramal Imaging is proud to announce it will provide funding and support, along with other industry partners, for a major clinical study titled, “Imaging Dementia – Evidence for Amyloid Scanning” (IDEAS). The trial is designed to evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning of beta-amyloid deposits in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in a defined patient population. Piramal Imaging’s FDA-approved diagnostic radiotracer for brain beta-amyloid detection, Neuraceq(TM) (florbetaben F18 injection), will be one of three radiotracers used in the study.

ImaginAb Enters into Exclusive Licensing Agreement with UCLA for Immune Cell Imaging Agents

ImaginAb, Inc. and the Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have executed a technology licensing agreement relating to novel immune cell-targeting agents for imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Inflammation and immune response play a fundamental role in a wide variety of diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. Under the agreement, ImaginAb gains exclusive access to novel imaging agents that target specific markers of murine T-cells, enabling a new understanding of response to immunotherapeutic drugs in pre-clinical models.

GE Healthcare Receives FDA Clearance For Q.Clear Technology

GE Healthcare, a unit of General Electric Company (NYSE: GE), recently announced that it received U.S. FDA 510(k) clearance of its Q.Clear^ technology – technology that can provide up to two times improvement in both quantitative accuracy and image quality in PET/CT imaging. This is an innovative new tool for clinicians across the entire care continuum including diagnosis, staging, treatment planning, and treatment assessment.

Inventages Portfolio Company, Cognoptix, Demonstrates the Ability to Accurately Identify Alzheimer’s Disease

Inventages announces that one of its portfolio companies, Cognoptix, has demonstrated unprecedented accuracy in detecting Alzheimer’s disease. A multi-site clinical trial of the SAPPHIRE II eye test showed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 95% in differentiating Alzheimer’s disease patients from healthy volunteers.

Researchers Agree that Alzheimer’s Test Results Could be Released to Research Participants

A leading group of Alzheimer’s researchers contends that, as biomarkers to detect signals of the disease improve at providing clinically meaningful information, researchers will need guidance on how to constructively disclose test results and track how disclosure impacts both patients and the data collected in research studies. A survey conducted by a group including experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a majority of Alzheimer’s researchers supported disclosure of results to study participants. The study is published online in Neurology.

“While this is not a call to immediately tell subjects their biomarker results, it does show that the field is moving to a point where experts want to share valid and meaningful results with participants,” said co-senior author Jason Karlawish, MD, professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics and Health Policy. “As we gain more data on the predictive abilities of these measurements, we will need models and methods to effectively reveal results.”

The study surveyed 139 Alzheimer’s clinical trial leaders and coordinators from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in April 2012, just before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the amyloid-binding radiotracer known as Amyvid (florbetapir). 73 percent of respondents supported disclosing amyloid imaging results to study participants with mild cognitive impairment, whereas 58 percent supported giving amyloid imaging results to those with normal cognition.

Six themes emerged from the survey, regarding participant preferences and cognition levels, researchers’ requests to develop standardized counseling procedures, participant education, and standardization of data-gathering, and concerns regarding potential harms and benefits to participants, as well as the ways disclosure could impact study results.

Currently, ADNI has a policy to not disclose results to participants, but the survey showed a growing trend of experts who would favor revising this policy. In addition to finding amyloid imaging results valuable, Alzheimer’s experts also valued other biomarker data collected in ADNI, such as spinal fluid tests, PET imaging, and other psychometric tests, suggesting that if amyloid imaging results were allowed to be disclosed, it would likely lead to disclosure of other test results.

Study: Using AD biomarker research results for clinical care [Neurology] 

Source: EurekAlert!