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FDA Grants Genentech’s Perjeta Accelerated Approval for Use Before Surgery in People With HER2-Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval of a Perjeta® (pertuzumab) regimen for neoadjuvant treatment (use before surgery) in people with high-risk, HER2-positive early stage breast cancer. This approval is based primarily on data from a Phase II study showing that nearly 40 percent of people receiving the combination of Perjeta, Herceptin® (trastuzumab) and docetaxel chemotherapy had no evidence of tumor tissue detectable at the time of surgery (known as a pathological complete response, or pCR). The Perjeta regimen is the first neoadjuvant breast cancer treatment approved by the FDA and also the first to be approved based on pCR data.

Aseptika Awarded UK Patent for Home Test for Lung Infections

Aseptika recently announced that it has been granted a patent in the UK protecting its invention for a test for lung infections, designed to be used by patients at home and by clinicians at the bedside of patients in hospitals. With this new test, vulnerable patients with long-term conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma, can keep a check on their health by measuring the activity of pathogenic bacteria in their lungs with a simple test using a sample of sputum.

FDA Advisory Committee Recommends Accelerated Approval of Genentech’s Perjeta for Neoadjuvant Use in HER2-Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee (ODAC) voted 13 to 0, with one abstention, in favor of recommending accelerated approval of a Perjeta® (pertuzumab) regimen for neoadjuvant treatment (use before surgery) in people with high-risk, HER2-positive early stage breast cancer. The FDA will make a decision on whether or not to approve Perjeta for this use by October 31, 2013. If approved, the Perjeta regimen will be the first neoadjuvant breast cancer treatment approved in the United States and the first treatment approved based on pathological complete response (pCR) data, meaning there is no tumor tissue detectable at the time of surgery.

Perjeta is already approved in a number of countries including the United States for people with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (an advanced form of the disease in which the cancer has spread to other parts of the body).

The Perjeta application for neoadjuvant use follows a proposed new FDA pathway designed to more quickly bring promising medicines to people with earlier stages of breast cancer, where treatment may have a greater impact.

“More than 6,000 people in the United States die of HER2-positive breast cancer each year,” said Hal Barron, M.D., chief medical officer and head, Global Product Development. “The ODAC’s recommendation is a step toward bringing Perjeta to people with HER2-positive early stage breast cancer, where treatment can potentially prevent the disease from returning and spreading.”

Neoadjuvant treatment may allow a doctor to quickly assess whether a medicine is working and may also reduce a tumor’s size so it is easier to surgically remove. pCR is a common measure of neoadjuvant treatment effect in breast cancer and can be assessed more quickly than traditional endpoints in early stage breast cancer.

The ODAC recommendation was based on a review of results from NEOSPHERE and TRYPHAENA, two Phase II studies of Perjeta in high-risk, HER2-positive early stage breast cancer, as well as on longer-term safety data from the Phase III CLEOPATRA study of Perjeta in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

The ongoing Phase III APHINITY study will further evaluate Perjeta in the adjuvant setting (after surgery) and compares Perjeta, Herceptin® (trastuzumab) and chemotherapy with Herceptin and chemotherapy in people with HER2-positive early stage breast cancer. The study has completed enrollment with approximately 4,800 people, and the primary endpoint is invasive disease-free survival (IDFS). Genentech has proposed this study as a confirmatory study to the FDA. Data are expected in 2016.

Source: Genentech

New Test for Cancer Researchers Targets Important Tumor-suppressor Protein

As researchers push to develop more customized diagnostics and therapies for solid tumor cancers, they demand increasingly sensitive tests that offer reliable, reproducible analysis. Spring Bioscience, Inc. (Spring) recently announced a new addition to its specialized portfolio of valuable antibodies for cancer research with the introduction of the Anti-PTEN (SP218) rabbit monoclonal immunohistochemistry (IHC) antibody.

PTEN is a common protein found in most tissues of the body. The protein acts as part of a critical cell signaling pathway that tells cells to stop dividing, helping to prevent uncontrolled cell growth that can lead to the formation of tumors. Mutations in the PTEN gene, together with other factors resulting in loss of PTEN protein, are a step in the development of many human cancers, including prostate and colon cancer. PTEN mutations are also believed to be the cause of a variety of inherited predispositions to cancer.

“With SP218, we’re seeking to set a new gold standard across the industry by offering an extremely sensitive, highly specific antibody optimized for IHC testing that will allow researchers and pathologists to interpret PTEN status with utmost confidence,” says Spring General Manager Michael Rivers. “For our customers, this means we’re continuing to offer unparalleled value through superior tests that lead the market in innovation, reliability and quality.”

Spring internal comparison studies demonstrated that SP218 provides more accurate, sensitive, and specific detection compared to similar research use only (RUO) tests on the market today.

Samples from more than 100 cases of primary prostate and colon cancer showed 100 percent concordance for PTEN loss among Spring’s SP218 and the leading commercially-available PTEN RUO tests; however, competitor tests exhibited some undesirable non-specific staining in IHC testing, while SP218 demonstrated highly specific staining in cells with and without PTEN expression.

“SP218’s robust and consistent performance with IHC analysis is particularly important given PTEN’s potential as a companion diagnostic biomarker,” adds Rivers. “Spring Bioscience is owned by Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., a member of the Roche group, and serves as an Antibody Center of Excellence for Roche’s companion diagnostics development to advance our goal for Personalized Healthcare.”

“Several pharma partners have embraced SP218 as their go-to antibody for PTEN IHC and are including it in their clinical trials as a potential companion diagnostic,” says Doug Ward, VP and Lifecycle Leader, Ventana Companion Diagnostics. “In addition, the Ventana Translational Diagnostics CAP/CLIA Laboratory is now using SP218 as their preferred RUO test for PTEN protein expression.”

Spring is known across the research industry for its quality development practices and for delivering a consistent supply of highly-specific antibodies. SP218 meets the company’s high standards as a valuable tool for assessing PTEN loss.

Source: Spring Bioscience

Key Assay Development at HUPO

Proteome Sciences presented novel data and key assay developments at the HUPO 12th Annual World Congress in Japan covering Tau in Alzheimer’s disease, SysQuant® in pancreatic cancer and a missing isoform in sugar structures of clusterin, a plasma protein biomarker for Alzheimer’s in brain atrophy.

pTau

The new Tau phosphorylation assay (pTau SRM) demonstrated powerful sensitivity and reproductivity measuring Tau phosphorylation on human and mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease from a much smaller sample amount.

In a different application the pTau SRM was successfully used to determine the effect of Tau kinase inhibitors PS110 and PS278-05 on CK1d on the Tau protein in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s. The results confirmed that Tau phosphorylation was reduced by the two compounds but not affected by the control substance.

SysQuant®

Over 5,000 different phosphorylation sites were quantified in tumour and healthy tissue in pancreas cancer with SysQuant®. In addition to major alterations in proteins related to cell morphology and motility, individual patterns of pathway activation were able to accurately predict the likelihood of tumour recurrence and to provide a truly personalised treatment regime.

Glycopreotomics

Novel data was presented that showed diagnostic changes in sugar structures attached to clusterin, a plasma marker for Alzheimer’s in brain atrophy. This revealed a unique isoform that lacked a specific branching pattern in patients with high levels of brain atrophy.

Commenting from Yokohama, Dr. Ian Pike, Chief Operating Officer, said: 

“We were delighted to be invited to the 12th HUPO congress to show results from the powerful biomarker services platform that we have developed from our TMT® mass tags for customers where we are at the forefront in proteomics. New assays for pTau and clusterin glycoprotein provide important additions to the range of assays and services that we offer our customers in Alzheimer’s The added power delivered by SysQuant® identifies thousands of phosphorylation sites across key signalling pathways that give clinicians the ability for the first time to provide real time patient management, in this case in pancreas cancer. These are exciting developments from proteomics that are fundamentally changing how clinicians identify and manage disease.”

Source: Proteome Sciences