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Edico Genome Issued Broad Patent for DRAGEN from United States Patent and Trademark Office

Edico Genome, developer of the world’s first Bio-IT Processor, DRAGEN™, a solution that enables fast and cost-effective analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, recently announced the United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued to the company U.S. patent number 9,014,989. This patent broadly covers proprietary processes that are core to DRAGEN, including bioinformatics protocols and functions necessary for the analysis of genomic data on integrated circuits and hardware processing platforms. The patent will provide protection until 2035 and is entitled “Bioinformatics Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods Executed on an Integrated Circuit Processing Platform.”

Aseptika Awarded UK Patent for Home Test for Lung Infections

Aseptika recently announced that it has been granted a patent in the UK protecting its invention for a test for lung infections, designed to be used by patients at home and by clinicians at the bedside of patients in hospitals. With this new test, vulnerable patients with long-term conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma, can keep a check on their health by measuring the activity of pathogenic bacteria in their lungs with a simple test using a sample of sputum.

Metabolon and Stemina Biomarker Discovery Settle Patent Dispute

Metabolon, Inc. and Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc. have entered into a licensing agreement and dismissed the patent litigation which was pending in the United States District Court, Western District of Wisconsin. Terms of the licensing agreement have not been released.

Elizabeth Donley, Chief Executive Officer of Stemina, said “We are happy to have reached an agreement with Metabolon and to have settled our differences in a way that allows both companies to move forward.” Donley stated she is focused on ongoing autism studies and raising money to accelerate the pace to market for Stemina’s blood test for autism as well as putting the final details together on a large contract with the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

“We are pleased to reach an agreement that brings our pending litigation to an end and further underscores the significant value of Metabolon’s technological innovations and Intellectual Property,” said John Ryals, CEO and President of Metabolon. Ryals continued, “Our focus continues to be the needs of our collaborators and the advancement of the metabolomics science for biomarker discovery, to uncover solutions in medical and nutritional research and the life sciences.”

Source: Business Wire

Discovered a Genetic Biomarker that Detects Lewy Body Dementia

The Germans Trias i Pujol Health Sciences Research Institute (IGTP) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have discovered the first genetic biomarker to detect Lewy body dementia (LBD), a disease that can be confused with Alzheimer’s. This biomarker is found in 20% of cases and differentiates one of the sub-groups of the pathology. Licensed to the Grifols company, it will lead to more precise diagnosis and treatment.

Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the second cause of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease. The symptoms of both diseases are very similar, since in both cases there is a gradual deterioration in mental capacity, affecting memory, thought processes, behaviour and physical activity. These similarities mean that some patients with LBD are wrongly diagnosed and treated with the usual drugs for Alzheimer’s. But this treatment causes adverse reactions in approximately half of these patients, making the disease much worse in some cases.

Currently there is no specific test to diagnose LBD. In practice, various neurological and neuropsychological tests are used to detect the disease and its possible overlap with other disorders, but clinical diagnosis of LBD is not very accurate.

The research, conducted by the IGTP and the UAB, has led to the discovery of the first genetic biomarker, found in 20% of LBD cases, and differentiating between one sub-group of LBD and Alzheimer’s disease. “Although this marker only detects a certain number of LBD sufferers, it significantly increases diagnostic sensitivity to the disease and these patients can get an accurate diagnosis and therefore the right treatment”, explains Dr Katrin Beyer, head of the research project and belonging to the Group of Structural and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology at the Germans Trias Hospital and Institute.

The researchers first detected the marker through a study of post mortem brain samples, in which they observed an alteration in the expression of the enzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) in the brains of patients with LBD. These data indicated that there could be genetic alterations in the BCHE gene promoter, causing changes in the expression of the gene. In fact, they found four polymorphisms in the LBD promoter region that, in certain combinations, are associated with LBD. These findings, which have been patented, make it possible to determine if a patient has LBD, distinguishing it from Alzheimer’s disease.

Currently, the patent is in its last stage of validation, which is being carried out in collaboration with neurologists from the Neurodegenerative Disease Unit of the Germans Trias Hospital and Bellvitge Hospital.

The licensing agreement with the Grifols company means the results can be applied, thus providing a simple, rapid, and effective procedure for diagnosing LBD in hospitals. Moreover, the marker can also be used to design clinical studies to help identify groups of patients with a more accurate diagnosis, removing, for example, LBD cases from a group of Alzheimer’s patients.

Grifols is a global company that for over 70 years has been providing therapeutic treatments with plasmatic proteins, technology for clinical diagnosis and pharmaceutical products for hospital use. It is now the third worldwide producer of biological drugs derived from plasma, is present in over 100 countries and is a world leader in plasma supplies, with 150 blood donation centres in the United States.

Source: EurekAlert!

Faster, Simpler Diagnosis for Fibromyalgia May be on the Horizon

Researchers have developed a reliable way to use a finger-stick blood sample to detect fibromyalgia syndrome, a complicated pain disorder that often is difficult to diagnose.

If it were someday made available to primary care physicians, the test could knock up to five years off of the wait for a diagnosis, researchers predict.

In a pilot study, the scientists used a high-powered and specialized microscope to detect the presence of small molecules in blood-spot samples from patients known to have fibromyalgia.

By “training” the equipment to recognize that molecular pattern, the researchers then showed that the microscope could tell the difference between fibromyalgia and two types of arthritis that share some of the same symptoms.

Though more analysis is needed to identify exactly which molecules are related to development of the disorder itself, the researchers say their pilot data are promising.

“We’ve got really good evidence of a test that could be an important aid in the diagnosis of fibromyalgia patients,” said Tony Buffington, professor of veterinary clinical sciences at The Ohio State University and senior author of the study. “We would like this to lead to an objective test for primary care doctors to use, which could produce a diagnosis as much as five years before it usually occurs.”

Patients with fibromyalgia are often desperate by the time they receive treatment because of the lengthy process required to make a diagnosis. The main symptoms, persistent pain and fatigue, mimic many other conditions, so physicians tend to rule out other potential causes before diagnosing fibromyalgia. Additional symptoms include disrupted sleep and memory or thought problems. An estimated 5 million American adults have the disorder, according to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

“The importance of producing a faster diagnosis cannot be overstated, because patients experience tremendous stress during the diagnostic process. Just getting the diagnosis actually makes patients feel better and lowers costs because of reductions in anxiety,” said Kevin Hackshaw, associate professor of medicine, division of rheumatology and immunology, at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center and lead author of the study.

The study is published in the Aug. 21, 2013, issue of the journal Analyst.

The technology used in this work is infrared microspectroscopy, which identifies the biochemical content of a blood sample based on where peaks of molecules appear in the infrared spectrum. The technology offers hints at the molecules present in the samples based on how molecular bonds vibrate when they are struck by light.

The spectroscopy works on dried blood, so just a few drops from a finger stick produce enough blood to run this test.

Researchers first obtained blood samples from patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia (14), rheumatoid arthritis (15) and osteoarthritis (12). These other conditions were chosen for comparison because they produce similar symptoms as fibromyalgia, but are easier to diagnose.

The scientists analyzed each sample with the infrared microspectroscopy to identify the molecular patterns associated with each disease. This functioned as a “training” phase of the study.

When the researchers then entered blinded blood samples into the same machinery, each condition was accurately identified based on its molecular patterns.

“It separated them completely, with no misclassifications,” Buffington said. “That’s very important. It never mistook a patient with fibromyalgia for a patient with arthritis. Clearly we need more numbers, but this showed the technique is quite effective.”

The researchers also analyzed some of the potential chemicals that could someday function as biomarkers in the fibromyalgia blood samples, but further studies are needed to identify the molecules responsible for the spectral patterns, he said.

Though an infrared microscope can be expensive, Buffington said the testing could be affordable if a central lab existed to run the samples. That the method can use dried blood samples makes this concept feasible because dried blood can be legally sent via U.S. mail, he noted.

Why is a veterinarian pursuing this type of research? Buffington is a renowned expert on domestic cats, including a painful bladder disorder they suffer called interstitial cystitis (IC). This syndrome also occurs in humans.

It turns out that the origins of IC, like such human disorders as irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia, cannot be traced to the specific area of the anatomy most affected by the syndrome. These disorders are categorized as medically unexplained or functional syndromes, and Buffington has explored the possibility that a common link exists among these types of diseases, and that they might have origins in the central nervous system.

Buffington has filed two invention disclosures with the university, and Ohio State has filed multiple patent applications for the testing method, in the United States and internationally. In November, Ohio State was issued U.S. Patent 8,309,931 on a rapid diagnostic method for functional syndromes in humans and cats.

Additional co-authors include Luis Rodriguez-Saona and Marçal Plans of the Department of Food Science and Technology at Ohio State, and Lauren Bell of Metabolon Inc., based in Durham, N.C.

Study: A bloodspot-based diagnostic test for fibromyalgia syndrome and related disorders [Analyst]

Source: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center