Quantcast

Industry news that matters to you.  Learn more

Definiens and Advanced Cell Diagnostics Launch Software for Quantitative RNA In Situ Hybridization

Definiens AG, a healthcare company that advances personalized medicine through image analysis and digital pathology solutions, and Advanced Cell Diagnostics (ACD) of Hayward California, a leader in molecular pathology, announced recently the commercial launch of RNAscope® SpotStudio™, a custom-designed image analysis software application for ACD’s RNAscope®Assays to detect and quantify RNA biomarkers. By combining state-of-the-art image analysis and advanced in situ hybridization technologies, gene expression can be measured quantitatively at single cell resolution and interpreted by pathologists within context.

BIDMC Cardiovascular Institute Researchers Will Lead $4 Million NIH Grant to Study MicroRNAs

A cardiovascular research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), led by BIDMC Principal Investigator Saumya Das, MD, PhD, has been awarded a $4 million Common Fund grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of a newly formed program on Extracellular RNA Communication. The five-year grant will focus on identifying microRNA biomarkers in heart disease.

Each year, complications from heart attacks (myocardial infarctions) contribute to more than half a million cases of heart failure and 300,000 cases of sudden cardiac arrest, when the heart suddenly stops. Both of these conditions are closely related to a process known as remodeling, in which the structure and function of the heart changes – or remodels — following a heart attack.

“Our goal is to explore the role that microRNAs play in predicting which heart-attack patients will go on to experience complications,” explains Das, an electrophysiologist in BIDMC’s Cardiovascular Institute and co-director of the cardiovascular genetics program within the Outpatient Cardiovascular Clinic.

“Current strategies used to identify the highest risk patients have often been inaccurate,” he adds. “We think that a blood test that makes use of microRNA biomarkers could replace existing strategies and more accurately predict which patients might experience poor outcomes and thereby identify who would most benefit from frequent monitoring and medical care.” Other investigators who are part of the NIH grant, “Plasma miRNA Predictors of Adverse Mechanical and Electrical Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction,” include BIDMC Director of Cardiovascular Research Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, and BWH investigators Raymond Y. Kwong, MD, MPH, and Mark Sabatine, MD, MPH.

microRNAs are one type of extracellular RNA. Once considered nothing more than genomic “junk,” microRNAs have more recently been recognized as playing a key role in cellular functions. Several years ago, scientists began to recognize that these small, noncoding RNAs were not only found inside cells, but could also be found in blood and other tissue fluids.

Using patient plasma samples from extensively characterized patients who have suffered heart attacks, the scientific team will first identify which specific microRNAs are related to poor heart remodeling. They will then use cell culture and animal models of heart disease to further prioritize which microRNAs play a functional role in disease progression. Finally, the investigators will validate these prioritized microRNAs as prognostic markers for poor health outcomes after heart attacks in a large prospective clinical trial.

“Ultimately, we think that miRNA-based tests could replace current tests to predict which patients might be at risk of complications and, therefore, be good candidates to receive an implanted defibrillator,” says Das. “At the same time, we hope to be able to better predict which individuals are at less risk of complications – and thereby spare them unnecessary and costly procedures.”

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School, and currently ranks third in National Institutes of Health funding among independent hospitals nationwide.

BIDMC has a network of community partners that includes Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Milton, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Needham, Anna Jaques Hospital, Cambridge Health Alliance, Lawrence General Hospital, Signature Health Care, Commonwealth Hematology-Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess HealthCare, Community Care Alliance, and Atrius Health. BIDMC is also clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center and Hebrew Senior Life and is a research partner of Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. BIDMC is the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox. For more information, visit www.bidmc.org.

Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Mayo Clinic Hosts NIH Genomics Director at Individualizing Medicine Conference

From Promise to Practice is the title and the main message of the second annual Individualizing Medicine Conference at Mayo Clinic, Sept. 30-Oct. 2. Physicians from more than 40 states and several countries will be arriving in Minnesota to hear and learn about the latest developments and research in genomic research and how to move these discoveries into the medical practice. “Our goal is to inform practicing physicians, but other care providers, students, media and the public as well,” says Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., chair of this year’s conference held by Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine. “Individualizing prevention, diagnosis and treatment is the core of medical genomics and the future of medicine. Even if you missed the last 13 years since the mapping of the human genome, we’ll help you catch up in three days.”

Opening keynote speaker on Monday, September 30, will be Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Genomic Health Research, Bethesda, M.D. Co-hosts for the conference will be Richard Besser, M.D., chief health and medical editor for ABC News and former acting director of the Centers for Disease Control, and Ceci Connolly, managing director of the Health Research Institute, PwC.

The conference offers expert speakers, focused breakout sessions, and real-life case studies so participants can discover and discuss emerging topics in medical genomics. Topics range from translating genomic findings into clinical care to communicating accurately and ethically with patients. Also this year, on Sunday, Sept. 29, an “Omics 101” seminar will be offered at a lay level for those new to individualized medicine. This course is being offered separately and is ideal for students and media who will be working in or reporting on the genomics field.

Individualized medicine is a growing field of patient care based on the increasing knowledge of the human genome, mapped just a decade ago. Mayo Clinic is a leader in transferring medical genomics to medical practice clinomics as evidenced by its Individualized Medicine Clinic, launched a year ago. Mayo’s Center for Individualized Medicine also includes programs in biomarker discovery, pharmacogenomics, epigenomics and the human microbiome.

Source: Mayo Clinic

Study Says New Biomarker May Predict Mesothelioma Survival, According to Surviving Mesothelioma

A team of researchers at Australia’s University of New South Wales say MUC1, a glycoprotein found on the outer surface of epithelial cells, is overexpressed in peritoneal mesothelioma. MUC1 is a mucin, a type of protein that helps protect the body against infection by binding with pathogens in the extracellular space and preventing them from entering cells.

Although MUC1 overexpression can predict poor survival in most cancers, and is often used to help diagnose mesothelioma, the Australian study is the first to measure its prognostic significance in mesothelioma, a rare cancer brought on by asbestos exposure. Mesothelioma most often occurs on the membrane that lines the lungs but peritoneal mesothelioma affects the lining of the abdomen. It accounts for about 25 to 30 percent of mesothelioma cases and, like all types of mesothelioma, is usually deadly.

Of the 42 peritoneal mesothelioma patients in the new study, 38 showed overexpression of MUC1. The significance of that overexpression was measured using the Kaplan-Meier method. Mesothelioma patients with a MUC1 level (based on immunohistochemical tests) between 5 and 8 had the lowest survival in all subtypes of tumors. Of the different variables tested – including tumor subtype, patient gender, peritoneal cancer index, and age at diagnosis – only a high MUC1 level and being over 60 years old at the time of diagnosis were consistently associated with poor outcomes.

Writing on their findings in the International Journal of Biological Markers, the authors conclude, “MUC1 evaluation by immunohistochemistry may serve as a useful prognostic tool in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, but may need further confirmation in larger patients’ cohort.” Earlier this year, the same team of researchers determined that high expression of BCL2, a protein that helps regulate cell death (apoptosis), is associated with a good prognosis for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma.

In clinical practice, biomarkers are often used to help plan a treatment strategy for mesothelioma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

The original study appears in a recent issue of the International Journal of Biological Markers. (Pillai, K, et al, “MUC1 has prognostic significance in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma”, July 4, 2013, International Journal of Biological Markers, Epub head of print. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23828409)

Study: MUC1 has prognostic significance in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma [International Journal of Biological Markers]

Source: PR Web

BIDMC Cardiovascular Institute Researchers Will Lead $4 Million NIH Grant to Study MicroRNAs

A cardiovascular research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), led by BIDMC Principal Investigator Saumya Das, MD, PhD, has been awarded a $4 million Common Fund grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of a newly formed program on Extracellular RNA Communication. The five-year grant will focus on identifying microRNA biomarkers in heart disease.

Each year, complications from heart attacks (myocardial infarctions) contribute to more than half a million cases of heart failure and 300,000 cases of sudden cardiac arrest, when the heart suddenly stops. Both of these conditions are closely related to a process known as remodeling, in which the structure and function of the heart changes – or remodels — following a heart attack.

“Our goal is to explore the role that microRNAs play in predicting which heart-attack patients will go on to experience complications,” explains Das, an electrophysiologist in BIDMC’s Cardiovascular Institute and co-director of the cardiovascular genetics program within the Outpatient Cardiovascular Clinic.

“Current strategies used to identify the highest risk patients have often been inaccurate,” he adds. “We think that a blood test that makes use of microRNA biomarkers could replace existing strategies and more accurately predict which patients might experience poor outcomes and thereby identify who would most benefit from frequent monitoring and medical care.” Other investigators who are part of the NIH grant, “Plasma miRNA Predictors of Adverse Mechanical and Electrical Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction,” include BIDMC Director of Cardiovascular Research Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, and BWH investigators Raymond Y. Kwong, MD, MPH, and Mark Sabatine, MD, MPH.

microRNAs are one type of extracellular RNA. Once considered nothing more than genomic “junk,” microRNAs have more recently been recognized as playing a key role in cellular functions. Several years ago, scientists began to recognize that these small, noncoding RNAs were not only found inside cells, but could also be found in blood and other tissue fluids.

Using patient plasma samples from extensively characterized patients who have suffered heart attacks, the scientific team will first identify which specific microRNAs are related to poor heart remodeling. They will then use cell culture and animal models of heart disease to further prioritize which microRNAs play a functional role in disease progression. Finally, the investigators will validate these prioritized microRNAs as prognostic markers for poor health outcomes after heart attacks in a large prospective clinical trial.

“Ultimately, we think that miRNA-based tests could replace current tests to predict which patients might be at risk of complications and, therefore, be good candidates to receive an implanted defibrillator,” says Das. “At the same time, we hope to be able to better predict which individuals are at less risk of complications – and thereby spare them unnecessary and costly procedures.”

Source: EurekAlert!