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KineMed Announces Participation in a Global, Multi-Company Effort to Advance and Standardize a Diabetic Research Model

KineMed, Inc. announced participation in a global, two year, multi-organization effort to advance and standardize a single mouse model of early diabetic disease detection and progression. The two year effort brings together cutting edge expertise and technology with a goal to produce a new mouse research model system that can streamline the research and development of advances in diabetic research and improve the clinical success of programs using the model.

Test Could Identify Which Prostate Cancers Require Treatment

The level of expression of three genes associated with aging can be used to predict whether seemingly low-risk prostate cancer will remain slow-growing, according to researchers at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center. Use of this three-gene biomarker, in conjunction with existing cancer-staging tests, could help physicians better determine which men with early prostate cancer can be safely followed with “active surveillance” and spared the risks of prostate removal or other invasive treatment. The findings were published recently in the online edition of Science Translational Medicine.

Biomarker May Predict Prostate Cancers Requiring Treatment

Not all early-stage prostate cancer diagnoses are alike. While some patients have aggressive tumors, others have slow-growing, low Gleason score tumors that may not require treatment, but instead can be monitored with regular clinical evaluations. But distinguishing between prostate cancers that require treatment and those that do not is still a major challenge.

Researchers at Columbia University in New York City have now identified a 3-gene signature that could indicate whether a particular early-stage prostate cancer is indolent. The test relies on a tissue sample, and along with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and a histology assessment, could help clinicians make an accurate diagnosis. The early results, including a blinded retrospective analysis of 43 patients, show that the signature can accurately predict which patients with low-risk disease would develop metastatic prostate cancer and which patients would not progress. The study is published in Science Translational Medicine.

“These types of markers will, for the first time, give us the opportunity to measure biological features of cancer in the same patient, with multiple biopsies spread out over many years,” said Eric Klein, MD, chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.
Cory Abate-Shen, PhD, professor of urological oncology at Columbia University; Andrea Califano, PhD, professor of systems biology at Columbia University; and colleagues used a computational approach that identified three genes—FGFR1, PMP22, and CDKN1A—all associated with aging, that could accurately predict outcomes of low-risk, low Gleason score prostate tumors. Protein and mRNA levels of all three genes were high in those patients who had non-aggressive, indolent disease and low in those who had aggressive tumors.

Clinicians still rely on the Gleason score, a histology and pathology evaluation that does not incorporate any molecular assessment. Those patients with a Gleason score of 8 or higher are candidates for immediate treatment, but whether men with a score of 6 or 7 require treatment is difficult to assess—no test exists to identify the small percentage of patients who have early-stage prostate cancer that is more likely to metastasize.

The 3-gene signature was validated using an independent prostate cancer cohort. According to the study authors, the signature was prognostic and improved prognosis compared with the use of PSA and clinical assessment.

“We would predict that the test would be beneficial for patients with low Gleason score prostate tumors,” said Abate-Shen. “These patients are now typically monitored on active surveillance protocols, and the patients get a biopsy periodically. The test would be conducted on the biopsy.”

Rather than focusing on the entire genome, the researchers focused on 377 genes involved in aging, predicting that genes involved in aging and senescence are critical for tumor suppression. Cellular senescence is known to play a role in tumor suppression and is associated with benign prostate tumors both in the clinic and in mouse models, according to the researchers. Using a computational analysis called gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), they narrowed the long gene list to 19 genes, and then to a set of 3 genes that could identify indolent tumors.

“To focus on senescence genes is intellectually interesting,” said Klein. “There is already a body of work supporting the role of these genes in prostate cancer, but to my knowledge no one has looked at them in early-stage disease before.”

Forty-three patients, who had been under active surveillance for 10 years at Columbia University Medical School, were used for the blinded retrospective analysis to assess the predictive value of the gene signature. Each patient had been diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, with a Gleason score of 6 or less. The test was correctly able to identify all 14 patients who eventually developed advanced prostate cancer.

CDKN1A has been shown to be linked to senescence and to regulate the cell cycle. Previous studies have shown that downregulation of the gene is linked to cancer progression. The correlation of FGFR1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 1) with indolent tumors was surprising, as fibroblast growth factors have been shown to play a role in prostate cancer development. But, as the authors highlight in their discussion, FGFR1 signaling in prostate cancer is likely complex. The third gene in the signature, PMP22, encodes a glycoprotein expressed in neurons and has not been previously associated with prostate cancer.

This 3-gene signature is different from previously identified biomarkers, which have largely focused on advanced tumors. The potential biomarker test could complement other approaches in development, such as urine or blood tests, according to the authors.

A trial to validate the genetic signature is underway at Columbia University, and a national trial is being planned.

“It is really important to find novel ways to help to define early-stage tumors that may or may not progress to aggressive disease,” said Abate-Shen. “This will ultimately really help to minimize overtreatment, while capitalizing on the benefits of cancer screening.”

Other genomic approaches to distinguish indolent and aggressive disease are also underway. The first-generation expression-based tests, including Oncotype DX prostate and Prolaris, can facilitate clinical decisions based on the molecular characteristics of a prostate tumor. Both the available tests and the new ones “promise to reduce overtreatment and help men make the right decisions based on biology rather than uncertainty,” said Klein. 

Study: A Molecular Signature Predictive of Indolent Prostate Cancer [Science Translational Medicine]

Source: CancerNetwork

Key Assay Development at HUPO

Proteome Sciences presented novel data and key assay developments at the HUPO 12th Annual World Congress in Japan covering Tau in Alzheimer’s disease, SysQuant® in pancreatic cancer and a missing isoform in sugar structures of clusterin, a plasma protein biomarker for Alzheimer’s in brain atrophy.

pTau

The new Tau phosphorylation assay (pTau SRM) demonstrated powerful sensitivity and reproductivity measuring Tau phosphorylation on human and mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease from a much smaller sample amount.

In a different application the pTau SRM was successfully used to determine the effect of Tau kinase inhibitors PS110 and PS278-05 on CK1d on the Tau protein in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s. The results confirmed that Tau phosphorylation was reduced by the two compounds but not affected by the control substance.

SysQuant®

Over 5,000 different phosphorylation sites were quantified in tumour and healthy tissue in pancreas cancer with SysQuant®. In addition to major alterations in proteins related to cell morphology and motility, individual patterns of pathway activation were able to accurately predict the likelihood of tumour recurrence and to provide a truly personalised treatment regime.

Glycopreotomics

Novel data was presented that showed diagnostic changes in sugar structures attached to clusterin, a plasma marker for Alzheimer’s in brain atrophy. This revealed a unique isoform that lacked a specific branching pattern in patients with high levels of brain atrophy.

Commenting from Yokohama, Dr. Ian Pike, Chief Operating Officer, said: 

“We were delighted to be invited to the 12th HUPO congress to show results from the powerful biomarker services platform that we have developed from our TMT® mass tags for customers where we are at the forefront in proteomics. New assays for pTau and clusterin glycoprotein provide important additions to the range of assays and services that we offer our customers in Alzheimer’s The added power delivered by SysQuant® identifies thousands of phosphorylation sites across key signalling pathways that give clinicians the ability for the first time to provide real time patient management, in this case in pancreas cancer. These are exciting developments from proteomics that are fundamentally changing how clinicians identify and manage disease.”

Source: Proteome Sciences

Elevated Levels of Copper in Amyloid Plaques Associated with Neurodegeneration in Mouse Models of AD

Metals such as iron, copper, and zinc are important for many biological processes. In recent years, studies have shown that these nutritionally-essential metals are elevated in human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains and some animal models of AD. Scientists are now exploring whether these metals are causing the neurodegeneration seen in AD or are indicative of other ongoing pathologic processes.

In a new study, investigators used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy to image metal ions in the brain, focusing on the amyloid plaques that are the hallmark of AD. They found that, in two AD mouse models that exhibit neurodegeneration, the plaques contained about 25% more copper than an AD mouse model that shows little neurodegeneration. Looking at other metals, they found that none of the mouse models had significant increases in iron and very little increases in zinc. Metal content was not related to the age of the plaque. The study is reported in the current issue of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging.

“Since excess copper should not be ‘free’ in the brain to bind to the plaques, these data suggest that the cellular control of copper is altered in AD, which may lead to toxic reactions between free copper ions and neurons,” comments lead investigator Lisa M. Miller, PhD, a biophysical chemist in the Photon Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In previous work, Dr. Miller’s group found very high levels of copper in human AD plaques.

Since elevated iron in the AD brain is well documented in both human brains and AD mouse models, the researchers measured iron content in the cortex of all three mouse models. They found that iron content was doubled in all AD mouse model cortices compared to controls, whether or not the models showed neurodegeneration. Upon further investigation, spectroscopic data revealed that the excess iron was present in the ferric (oxidized) state and consistent with the iron storage protein ferritin. “The increase in iron may be a reflection of changes in metalloprotein content and metal storage within the brain that is not well understood,” says Dr. Miller.

Nevertheless, since iron in ferromagnetic and detectable through MRI, Dr. Miller suggests that in the future iron may be used as a biomarker for AD at early stages of disease, even before plaques are formed.

Source: Elevated copper in the amyloid plaques and iron in the cortex are observed in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease that exhibit neurodegeneration [Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging]

Source: EurekAlert!