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Cardiac Biomarker ST2 Proves Far Superior To Galectin-3 In A Head-to-Head Study

Critical Diagnostics recently announced that the study, “Head-to-head comparison of two myocardial fibrosis biomarkers for long-term heart failure risk stratification: ST2 vs. Galectin-3”, recently published online in JACC (the Journal of the American College of Cardiology) comparing the company’s novel cardiac biomarker ST2 to Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a biomarker from BG Medicine (NASDAQ: BGMD), found ST2 to be superior.

COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium Making Strides with Plasma Fibrinogen as New Biomarker

The COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) recently announced at the European Respiratory Society Annual Congress that it has submitted a Qualification Package to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for plasma fibrinogen as a new drug development tool. The Qualification Package is the result of progressive discussions between the FDA’s Qualification Review Team and the CBQC. The CBQC looks forward to the results of FDA review while planning for a fall 2013 submission to the European Medicines Agency.

Dr. Ruth Tal-Singer, CBQC co-chair, vice president, Clinical Discovery, Respiratory Area Therapy Unit at GlaxoSmithKline, notes, “To the best of CBQC’s knowledge, fibrinogen is the first clinical biomarker achieving this milestone in the U.S. This is a major milestone for the CBQC, and it highlights the power of working together across multiple companies, academic centers and government organizations to achieve our common objective of improving the way we study novel medicines for patients who need them.”

To support the submission, the CBQC compiled a unique database of subjects from five individual studies, allowing integrated analyses to support two proposed uses as a prognostic biomarker to enrich clinical trial populations with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) subjects at increased risk for all-cause mortality or COPD exacerbations.

A biomarker is a tool that can be used for early detection of a disease, selection of subjects for clinical trials or as an outcome for clinical trials. Fibrinogen, a protein that can be measured in the blood, is a promising biomarker which identifies a group representing 25 to 30 percent of all COPD patients (a COPD subtype).

Dr. Stephen Rennard, CBQC co-chair and Larson Professor of Medicine, University of Nebraska, adds, “COPD is extremely heterogeneous. This complicates development of new treatments, as individual COPD patients may respond differently. Fibrinogen has been submitted to the FDA as a tool that will help address this problem. Specifically, fibrinogen measurement can help identify COPD patients at risk for death or hospitalization, which can allow individuals to participate in studies of novel treatments designed to improve those outcomes.”

The CBQC, organized under the auspices of the COPD Foundation, is a public-private partnership among academic researchers, pharmaceutical companies and government parties and agencies.

John W. Walsh, president and co-founder, COPD Foundation, states, “The Consortium is providing a unique and productive opportunity to bring new drug development tools to the research community, with the ultimate goal of providing new treatments to patients who urgently need them.”

The CBQC Fibrinogen Working Group is composed of the following members:

  • Bruce Miller, industry co-chair, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ruth Tal-Singer, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Mike Lowings, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ubaldo Martin, AstraZeneca
  • Jeff Snyder, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Kay Tetzlaff, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Armin Furtwaengler, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Nicholas Locantore, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Nancy Leidy, Evidera
  • Amber Martin, Evidera
  • Jason Simeone, Evidera
  • David Mannino, academic co-chair, University of Kentucky
  • Stephen Rennard, University of Nebraska
  • David Lomas, University College London, U.K.
  • Jorgen Vestbo, University of Southern Denmark, University Hospital Manchester, U.K.
  • Graham Barr, Columbia University
  • Debora Merrill, COPD Foundation

Source: COPD Foundation

Thermo Fisher Scientific and Siemens Renew Partnership for Improved Detection of Sepsis Using B·R·A·H·M·S PCT Biomarker

Hospital laboratories outside the U.S. can benefit from a continued availability of the B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™ assay on ADVIA Centaur® systems, allowing them to diagnose sepsis early and safely.

Thermo Fisher and Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics renew their non-exclusive, long-term, royalty-bearing agreement for the use of Thermo Fisher’s Procalcitonin (B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™) technology, currently available as an automated immunoassay on the Siemens ADVIA Centaur® XP and CP systems in all countries outside the United States and China. The agreement extends a long-standing relationship between the companies.

ADVIA Centaur® B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™ immunoassay currently offers clinicians an integrated solution for accurately diagnosing sepsis and monitoring response to antibiotic therapy allowing for improved clinical decision making. The ADVIA Centaur® systems have a large global installed base in hospital clinical laboratories.

The PCT biomarker test is the gold standard for the early detection of sepsis in critically ill patients and is recommended to initiate, monitor and discontinue antibiotic treatment in the presence of relevant bacterial infections. Broader availability of PCT testing will lead to improved hospital management and care of patients with sepsis or at high risk of developing it.

“The continuation of our close collaboration with Siemens significantly increases the global reach of this critical biomarker, making it available to a broader patient population,” said Marc Tremblay, president of Thermo Fisher Scientific’s Clinical Diagnostics division. “The key for preventing sepsis is the early diagnosis of infections. Early diagnosis also reduces the health economic burden of sepsis therapy, a medical condition that is still very common today and accounts for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Therefore, PCT supports hospitals in optimizing their service levels and cost effectiveness in today’s challenging economic environment.”

The worldwide number of patients affected by sepsis is estimated to be 20 to 30 million annually and claims more lives than bowel and breast cancer combined. Despite advances in modern medicine, including antibiotics and vaccines, sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection with hospital mortality rates between 30 to 60%1. Hospital costs to treat severe sepsis in the U.S. are estimated at $16 billion dollars annually. Much of this cost is attributed to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, making rapid, more reliable detection a national, if not global, imperative. Research published in Critical Care Medicine showed that each hour of delay in therapy can decrease chances of patient survival by 7.6 percent.

Source: ThermoFisher Scientific

Abcodia Licenses the ‘Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm’ (ROCA) Developed at Massachusetts General Hospital and Queen Mary, University of London

Abcodia, the biomarker validation company with a focus on screening for cancer, today announced that it has entered into an agreement for an exclusive world-wide commercial license to the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) developed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Queen Mary, University of London.

ROCA has the potential to be a major breakthrough for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. The diagnosis of ovarian cancer is usually made when the disease has spread outside the ovaries and as a result the outcome is poor. In the 80% of cases of ovarian cancer in which diagnosis occurs in the later stages, the 5-year survival rate is less than 20%. If diagnosed early, 5-year survival exceeds 85%. Hence the need for early diagnosis, in the hope that current treatments will be more effective. Around the world, an estimated 200,000 new cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed in women each year and there are over 125,000 deaths.

ROCA is a test being validated for the screening of ovarian cancer. It was invented by Professor Ian Jacobs, Dean & Head School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical & Human Sciences, University of Manchester, and formerly of Queen Mary, University of London, and Dr Steven Skates of the Biostatistics Center, MGH, who together studied longitudinal patterns of CA125 in multiple cohorts of post-menopausal women to develop a statistical algorithm efficiently combining information in age and serial CA125 levels. ROCA has since shown excellent specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and sensitivity in large studies including UKCTOCS (UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening) and UKFOCSS (UK Familial Ovarian Cancer Screening Study).

A recent study by the MD Anderson Cancer Center in normal risk postmenopausal women reported a specificity of 99.9% and a PPV of 40% for ROCA when ultrasound was used as a secondary test. This confirms, in a USA population, results previously reported by the larger UKCTOCS trial involving 202,000 normal risk postmenopausal women. The published results from UKCTOCS2 indicate that, as well as achieving high specificity and PPV, ROCA can achieve a sensitivity of 89% for screen detection of ovarian cancer. UKCTOCS is a randomised trial comparing screening with standard care, and in 2015 will provide results on the impact of screening with ROCA on mortality and survival from ovarian cancer. The final data from UKCTOCS will be of great importance in guiding future clinical use of the ROCA in clinical practice.

Commenting on the recent MD Anderson publication, Professor Ian Jacobs, also Director of the UKCTOCS trial, said: “I am delighted to see the outcome of the MD Anderson 11 year study. The results reassuringly confirm in a USA setting those reported from the UKCTOCS prevalence study published in 2009. We now await further data from UKCTOCS in 2015 to establish whether the encouraging specificity and sensitivity data translate into improvements in survival and mortality which through early detection can help women affected by ovarian cancer.”

Dr Julie Barnes, Abcodia’s CEO, said: “The licensing of ROCA is a significant opportunity for Abcodia and we now intend to work with the co-founders to actively plan a commercialisation path that will in due course enable ROCA to be made available to women in Europe, US and around the world. We are currently in active discussions with partners in different territories to support our mission. Based on the reports to date, and in particular the sensitivity, specificity and PPV data, we will begin to explore ways in which the ROCA could be implemented in clinical practice. The eventual clinical use will of course be informed and guided by the outcome of UKCTOCS and other clinical trials.”

Source: Abcodia

Breakthrough Case Study Highlights New Biomarker for Cancer and Inflammation

A groundbreaking peer reviewed case report by Dr. Isaac Eliaz, M.D. of Amitabha Medical Clinic, demonstrates for the first time the clinical use of novel biomarker galectin-3 to assess cancer progression and inflammation. The case study titled, “The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities,” was published in the July 2013 issue of Case Reports in Oncology. This report is the first of its kind to expand the diagnostic and prognostic applications of the galectin-3 blood serum test, introducing an important clinical tool to assess risk and progression of metastatic cancer and inflammatory diseases.

In 2011, the galectin-3 blood test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the screening and prognosis of congestive heart failure and cardiovascular disease. Approval was granted after an extensive body of published data, including long-term population studies, demonstrated the active role of elevated galectin-3 in cardiovascular conditions, fibrosis and early mortality. However, a rapidly expanding field of published galectin-3 research also highlights the significance of this rogue molecule as a novel biomarker that is both an active culprit as well as a byproduct of numerous inflammatory and malignant cellular processes beyond cardiovascular disease.

An expert on galectin-3, Dr. Eliaz applies the data obtained in this case study to shed further light on excess galectin-3’s mechanisms of action, specifically inflammatory response to injury and cancer progression. In this report, Dr. Eliaz presents the first published case documenting the clinical use of galectin-3 to monitor cancer progression and treatment response, as well as inflammatory conditions. These findings point to an expanded clinical model using galectin-3 testing in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of numerous chronic, inflammatory diseases.

Unlike biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), which only indicate the presence of inflammation, galactin-3 is shown to play a direct role in initiating disease progression. It is a protein normally present in the body at low concentrations, where it is involved in numerous functions including cell growth and communication. At elevated levels, however, galectin-3 fuels numerous pathologic processes including chronic inflammation and the progression of inflammation to fibrosis; cancer cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Elevated galectin-3 also allows cancer cells to evade immune response. Research demonstrates elevated galectin-3 levels in patients with melanoma, lung, breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and head and neck cancers as well as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and others. Galectin-3 levels are also found to be higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized tumors.

Dr. Eliaz states, “This new case report and significant clinical observation supports the need for further research on the role of galectin-3. The galectin-3 test could well become one of our most important clinical tools in assessing and monitoring a wide range of conditions beyond cardiovascular disease, including metastatic cancer and inflammatory conditions.”

Study: The Role of Galectin-3 as a Marker of Cancer and Inflammation in a Stage IV Ovarian Cancer Patient with Underlying Pro-Inflammatory Comorbidities. [Case Reports in Oncology]

Source: PR Newswire