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Scientists Discover Why Some Cancers May Not Respond to Immunotherapy

UCLA scientists have discovered that people with cancers containing genetic mutations JAK1 or JAK2, which are known to prevent tumors from recognizing or receiving signals from T cells to stop growing, will have little or no benefit from the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab. This early-stage research has allowed them to determine for the first time why some people with advanced melanoma or advanced colon cancer will not respond to pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 treatment.

Investigational Blood Test Identifies Patients with Melanoma Who Are More Likely to Have Improved Survival on Nivolumab Therapy; Biodesix’ Blood Test is Independent of PD-L1 Expression

Biodesix, Inc. recently announced new clinical findings showing that its novel investigational test, BDX008, based on profiling serum proteins, identifies patients with advanced melanoma who are more likely to have longer progression-free and overall survival with nivolumab therapy.[1] Early data suggesting the test’s clinical potential for guiding anti-PD-1 therapy is being presented at the 30th annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) in National Harbor, MD.

Investigational Blood Test Identifies Patients with Melanoma Who Are More Likely to Have Improved Survival on Nivolumab Therapy

Biodesix, Inc. today announced new clinical findings showing that its novel investigational test, BDX008, based on profiling serum proteins, identifies patients with advanced melanoma who are more likely to have longer progression-free and overall survival with nivolumab therapy.1 Early data suggesting the test’s clinical potential for guiding anti-PD-1 therapy is being presented at the 30th annual meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) in National Harbor, MD.

Sequenom To Explore The Clinical Utility Of A Novel Liquid Biopsy Assay In Melanoma Patients In Collaboration With University Of Colorado Denver

Sequenom, Inc. (NASDAQ: SQNM), a life sciences company committed to enabling healthier lives through the development of innovative products and services, today announced that it has entered into a clinical collaboration with the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine (CU School of Medicine). Under this collaboration, CU School of Medicine will explore the utility of Sequenom’s research use only (RUO) liquid biopsy assay to determine whether ctDNA profiling can be used to monitor treatment response and relapse in melanoma patients. This technology has the potential to overcome the challenges and limitations associated with current methods to monitor treatment response such as invasive biopsies and repeated imaging studies.

Study Published in Nature Suggests immunoSEQ Assay May Be Used to Predict Response to anti-PD-1 Therapy for Melanoma

Adaptive Biotechnologies, a pioneer in leveraging Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to profile T- and B-cell receptors, recently reported that the immunoSEQ Assay was able to help identify patients with metastatic melanoma who would be most likely to respond to treatment with pembrolizumab (an anti-PD-1 therapy), according to a study published in Nature.