Quantcast

Industry news that matters to you.  Learn more

Philips and UC Irvine Partner to Develop Standards for Breast Cancer Screening

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) recently announced its collaboration with the University of California, Irvine, to explore how spectral breast imaging can improve breast density measurement, potentially aiding clinicians in more accurately gauging breast cancer risks and monitoring changes over time. The study will rely on Philips’ MicroDose SI mammography spectral imaging technology. Designed to address the industry’s growing concern about the lower diagnostic accuracy of mammography for high density breasts, MicroDose SI joins Philips’ suite of diagnostic imaging solutions designed to enhance imaging quality for confident diagnostics at a low dose.

Positive Clinical Breast Cancer Data Presented for NuView’s Molecular Imaging Biomarker NLS-VPAC1

NuView Life Sciences (NLS), a privately-held company developing next generation imaging diagnostic biomarkers with the ability to identify and locate disease in the earliest stages of development, today announced the presentation of positive clinical results for its Breast Cancer imaging agent NLS-VPAC1 (TP3805) at the 2nd World Congress on Ga-68 in Chandigarh, India on Feb 28th. NuView Life Sciences possesses exclusive worldwide commercialization rights to NLS-VPAC1.

Mathew Thakur, Ph.D., academic collaborator, Professor of Radiology and Director of Radiopharmaceutical Research and Molecular Imaging at Thomas Jefferson University (TJU), Philadelphia, presented data from his investigator-lead, Phase 1 feasibility study that imaged Breast Cancer in 19 patients by utilizing NLS-VPAC1 (labeled with the radioisotope 64Cu) with PET (positron emission tomography) and PEM (positron emission mammography). NLS-VPAC1 unequivocally identified 100% (n=20) of the malignant lesions, irrespective of their hormonal status. In addition, NLS-VPAC1 detected four sentinel lymph nodes (100%). NLS-VPAC1 imaging can be performed within 15 minutes of injection and does not require patient fasting or monitoring of their glycemic levels (unlike F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET), which is not a cancer-specific agent). Due to this rapid tumor uptake, NuView is additionally investigating use of NLS-VPAC1 labeled with the shorter half-lived isotope gallium-68. This pharmaceutical labeled with Ga-68 can be produced by generators at local radiopharmacies. NLS-VPAC1 imaging can be performed on any current or future PET-based instruments.

“We are very pleased about the results of NLS-VPAC1, these data are consistent with our hypothesis and its potential for non-invasive detection and localization of malignant tumors in the breast and potentially other tissues like prostate, bladder and lung,” stated Dr. Thakur.

“There are over 1.6 Million invasive breast biopsies performed each year in the U.S. at an average cost of $5,500 and over 80% result in a benign diagnosis,” stated Paul Crowe, CEO of NuView Life Sciences. “These results are an encouraging step for NuView and Dr. Thakur. NLS-VPAC1 clearly has the potential to provide early and accurate diagnosis to the physician, reduce pain and discomfort to the patient, and reduce the heavy financial burden on healthcare payors.”

NuView plans to initiate a multi-center Phase2 clinical trial in Breast Cancer in 2013. In addition, NuView and Dr. Thakur have been awarded a $2.6MM grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct an investigator-led, Phase 1 feasibility study with NLS-VPAC1 in Prostate Cancer patients. Planned initiation of this trial is 4Q 2013.

Source: PR Web

HALO Healthcare Finalizes License Agreement With University of North Dakota for Cancer Detection Biomarkers

HALO Healthcare, Inc., a provider of innovative diagnostic solutions for women’s breast care announced that it has signed a definitive license agreement with the University of North Dakota (UND) to develop biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer has significant health and economic benefits. The licensed UND technology is based on detecting cancer biomarkers in breast nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) which is the platform used for the HALO® Breast Test marketed by Halo Healthcare for breast cancer risk assessment. Over 25,000 HALO tests have been performed worldwide.

France Dixon Helfer, President and CEO of Halo Healthcare states, “This license has the opportunity of providing women all over the world an annual early breast detection test years before it is visible by mammography or other imaging technologies used for breast cancer screening. Our scientists are developing a laboratory ‘test kit’ which could revolutionize the breast cancer care path. This empowering breakthrough technology will enable physicians to find and treat breast cancer at a very early stage so all women can be spared the devastating effects of later staged breast cancer.”

Dr. Edward Sauter, the inventor of the biomarker technology and a practicing breast surgeon, acknowledges the potential clinical value by noting “this biomolecular technology strikes at the root cause of cancer and its development is the result of many years of research effort.” Dr. Sauter further states that “with appropriate clinical validation the test will be of great value to breast cancer specialists and to women.”

“The University of North Dakota is happy to have executed this definitive exclusive license agreement with HALO Healthcare, Inc.,” said Michael F. Moore, the university’s associate vice president, intellectual property commercialization & economic development. “We believe HALO Healthcare is a dedicated partner, committed to developing this technology to improve breast cancer diagnostic technology. UND looks forward to a long relationship with HALO Healthcare.”

Source: HALO Healthcare

Detecting Breast Cancer’s Fingerprint in a Droplet of Blood

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. The earlier cancer is detected, the better the chance of successful treatment and long-term survival. However, early cancer diagnosis is still challenging as testing by mammography remains cumbersome, costly, and in many cases, cancer can only be detected at an advanced stage. A team based in the Dept. of Biomedical Engineering at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine has developed a new microfluidics-based microarray that could one day radically change how and when cancer is diagnosed. Their findings are published in the April issue of the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics.

Real-time Quantitatve Analysis Imager Uses Prognostic Biomarkers to Characterize Breast Lesions

According to a presentation at the Radiological Society of North America’s 96th Scientific Assembly and Annual meeting (RSNA 2010), a real-time quantitative analysis workstation with functionality to evaluate multi-modality breast images could facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis and improve evaluation of treatment plan effectiveness.