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A Biomarker for Premature Death

A single blood test could reveal whether an otherwise healthy person is unusually likely to die of pneumonia or sepsis within the next 14 years. Based on an analysis of 10,000 individuals, researchers have identified a molecular byproduct of inflammation, called GlycA, which seems to predict premature death due to infections.

New Study Shows Cleveland HeartLab Inflammation Testing can Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks and Strokes, Averting $187 Million in Healthcare Costs for Cardiovascular Disease

Cleveland HeartLab Inc. (CHL), the premier cardiovascular disease management company, and MDVIP, the leader in personalized, preventive medicine, are pleased to announce the publication of a seminal peer review study in the Journal of Medical Economics. The study shows that by improving cardiovascular disease risk (CVD) assessment, CHL’s inflammation testing could reduce heart attacks and strokes by nearly 10 percent.

ImaginAb Enters into Exclusive Licensing Agreement with UCLA for Immune Cell Imaging Agents

ImaginAb, Inc. and the Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have executed a technology licensing agreement relating to novel immune cell-targeting agents for imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Inflammation and immune response play a fundamental role in a wide variety of diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. Under the agreement, ImaginAb gains exclusive access to novel imaging agents that target specific markers of murine T-cells, enabling a new understanding of response to immunotherapeutic drugs in pre-clinical models.

Aseptika Awarded UK Patent for Home Test for Lung Infections

Aseptika recently announced that it has been granted a patent in the UK protecting its invention for a test for lung infections, designed to be used by patients at home and by clinicians at the bedside of patients in hospitals. With this new test, vulnerable patients with long-term conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma, can keep a check on their health by measuring the activity of pathogenic bacteria in their lungs with a simple test using a sample of sputum.

Researchers Develop Specific Tests to Identify Cancer Biomarkers in Dermatomyositis

Researchers from major universities in the U.S. have developed specific tests to identify cancer biomarkers in patients with dermatomyositis—a systemic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of malignancy. According to study findings published in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) journal, Arthritis & Rheumatism, the assays detect antibodies against anti-transcriptional intermediary factor-1 (TIF-1γ) and nuclear matrix protein NXP-2.

Patients with dermatomyositis experience muscle weakness, skin inflammation, and sometimes inflammation of the lung. Most patients with dermatomyositis have auto-antibodies circulating in their bodies that cause distinct clinical disease features. Medical evidence suggests that these auto-antibodies in dermatomyositis patients stem from specific immune responses that shape various characteristics (phenotypes). In addition, up to 20% of those with dermatomyositis are at increased risk of malignancies.

“For the physician treating patients with dermatomyositis, identifying those at higher risk for cancer is a top priority,” explains Dr. David Fiorentino from Stanford University in Redwood City, Cal. “Our team focused on creating specific tests to detect antibodies against two specific proteins and then testing if those antibodies can identify dermatomyositis patients at higher risk of cancer.”

The team used both immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation techniques to detect antibodies against TIF-1γ and NXP-2 proteins. Blood analysis was performed on 111 patients from Stanford University Dermatology Clinic and 102 patients from the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Myositis Center. Both groups were similar in gender and age at diagnosis.

Results show that 17% and 38% of subjects in the two cohorts combined had antibodies against NXP-2 and TIF-1γ, respectively. Using the specific assays, researchers found 83% of dermatomyositis patients with cancer had a reaction to NXP-2 or TIF-1γ. Further analysis indicates that cancer, older age, and male gender were linked to NXP-2 or TIF-1γ antibodies, with anti-NXP-2 specifically associated with cancer in men.

“Our findings confirm the link between cancer and age in dermatomyositis, with a sharp increase in frequency at roughly 60 years of age.” concludes Dr. Fiorentino. “By determining the presence or absence of NXP-2 and TIF-1γ antibodies, we believe that this will aid clinicians in identifying those with the highest cancer risk.”

Study: Most patients with cancer-associated dermatomyositis have antibodies to nuclear matrix protein NXP-2 or transcription intermediary factor 1-gamma [Arthritis & Rheumatism]

Source: EurekAlert!