Quantcast

Industry news that matters to you.  Learn more

Advanced Cell Diagnostics Initiates Agreement to Study Biomarkers for Cancer Immunotherapy

Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD) announced today that they have entered into an agreement with The Johns Hopkins University on behalf of its Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins to use ACD’s proprietary RNAscope® technology platform to validate novel biomarkers and drug targets for cancer immunotherapy.

Cancer immunotherapy, which aims to mobilize a patient’s immune system to fight cancer, has been gaining momentum recently with the FDA approval of anti-CTLA-4 therapy for melanoma and with the recent impressive and durable remissions produced by targeting PD1 in multiple solid tumors in early-phase clinical trials led by Johns Hopkins investigators. With many additional immune modulatory molecules identified for targeting that play major roles in specific subsets of cancer, it will be critical to develop standardized biomarkers to guide the application of the most effective immune therapies on a patient by patient basis.

Targeting the immune checkpoints that are often suppressed in many cancers has demonstrated tremendous potential. However, to identify biomarkers useful for guiding therapy, conventional approaches to biomarker analysis have proven inadequate, leading to conflicting results.

“The complex interplay between cancer cells and the immune system in the tumor microenvironment matches perfectly with RNAscope’s capability of single molecule sensitivity and single cell resolution, which can help pinpoint which cell is talking to which other cell,” said Dr. Yuling Luo, Founder, President and CEO of ACD. Dr. Luo added, “That knowledge will be essential for selecting optimal targets for drug development and predicting which patient will benefit from it. We feel extremely fortunate to be able to provide such a tool to the pioneers in this emerging and exciting field.”

Source: Advanced Cell Diagnostics

Moffitt Researchers Identify Unique Immune Gene Signature Across Thousands of Patients’ Solid Tumors

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have discovered a unique immune gene signature that can predict the presence of microscopic lymph node-like structures in metastatic melanoma. The presence of these immune structures, the researchers said, appears to be associated with better survival and may indicate the possibility of selecting patients for immunotherapy based solely on the immune-related makeup of their tumors as an approach to personalized medicine.

Researchers Discover Blood Biomarker for Lou Gehrig’s Disease, Could Lead to New Treatments

Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) are the first to discover that changes in monocytes (a type of white blood cell) are a biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease. This finding also brings the medical community a step closer toward a new treatment for the debilitating neurological disease that affects approximately 30,000 Americans.

PROOF Centre and Adiga Life Sciences Launch Biomarker Discovery Collaboration

The Centre of Excellence for the Prevention of Organ Failure (PROOF Centre) is working with Adiga Life Sciences to develop better ways of monitoring the effectiveness of novel allergy vaccines through a discovery project aimed at identifying blood-based proteomic and genomic biomarkers. These biomarkers will enhance current understanding of how allergy vaccines work, and will guide the development of molecular tests for the diagnosis and management of allergic rhinitis.

Penn State Hershey and Serametrix to Seek Companion Diagnostic for Immunotherapy in Pediatric Cancers

Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital and Serametrix will collaborate on developing a diagnostic test for predicting individual clinical response to a novel immune therapy for brain cancer, it was announced today. The serum-based test is designed to determine patient immune responses from cancer immunotherapy, enabling clinicians to determine in the future which patients may be more likely to respond to this treatment regimen.