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Meso Scale Discovery Launches New V-PLEX Assays for Th17 Research

Meso Scale Discovery, a division of Meso Scale Diagnostics, LLC. (MSD), recently launched V-PLEX® immunoassays validated for the detection of the biomarkers IL-17A, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, IL-27, and MIP-3α in human cell culture supernatants, serum, plasma, and urine.

Meso Scale Discovery Launches V-PLEXTM Multiplex Biomarker Immunoassays

Meso Scale Discovery, a division of Meso Scale Diagnostics, LLC. (MSD®), recently announced the global launch of its V-PLEX biomarker tests, a new line of fully validated immunoassays for clinical research.

Thermo Fisher Scientific and Siemens Renew Partnership for Improved Detection of Sepsis Using B·R·A·H·M·S PCT Biomarker

Hospital laboratories outside the U.S. can benefit from a continued availability of the B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™ assay on ADVIA Centaur® systems, allowing them to diagnose sepsis early and safely.

Thermo Fisher and Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics renew their non-exclusive, long-term, royalty-bearing agreement for the use of Thermo Fisher’s Procalcitonin (B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™) technology, currently available as an automated immunoassay on the Siemens ADVIA Centaur® XP and CP systems in all countries outside the United States and China. The agreement extends a long-standing relationship between the companies.

ADVIA Centaur® B·R·A·H·M·S PCT™ immunoassay currently offers clinicians an integrated solution for accurately diagnosing sepsis and monitoring response to antibiotic therapy allowing for improved clinical decision making. The ADVIA Centaur® systems have a large global installed base in hospital clinical laboratories.

The PCT biomarker test is the gold standard for the early detection of sepsis in critically ill patients and is recommended to initiate, monitor and discontinue antibiotic treatment in the presence of relevant bacterial infections. Broader availability of PCT testing will lead to improved hospital management and care of patients with sepsis or at high risk of developing it.

“The continuation of our close collaboration with Siemens significantly increases the global reach of this critical biomarker, making it available to a broader patient population,” said Marc Tremblay, president of Thermo Fisher Scientific’s Clinical Diagnostics division. “The key for preventing sepsis is the early diagnosis of infections. Early diagnosis also reduces the health economic burden of sepsis therapy, a medical condition that is still very common today and accounts for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Therefore, PCT supports hospitals in optimizing their service levels and cost effectiveness in today’s challenging economic environment.”

The worldwide number of patients affected by sepsis is estimated to be 20 to 30 million annually and claims more lives than bowel and breast cancer combined. Despite advances in modern medicine, including antibiotics and vaccines, sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection with hospital mortality rates between 30 to 60%1. Hospital costs to treat severe sepsis in the U.S. are estimated at $16 billion dollars annually. Much of this cost is attributed to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, making rapid, more reliable detection a national, if not global, imperative. Research published in Critical Care Medicine showed that each hour of delay in therapy can decrease chances of patient survival by 7.6 percent.

Source: ThermoFisher Scientific

Sony DADC Develops Smart Consumables for Quanterix Simoa HD-1 Analyzer

Quanterix Corporation, delivering the world’s most sensitive single molecule immunoassay measurement for the benefit of human health, recently announced that the Simoa HD-1 Analyzer recently launched by Quanterix uses a “Smart Consumable” designed and manufactured by Sony DADC BioSciences called the Simoa Disc. For use in life science research today and in vitro diagnostics (IVD) markets in the future, the Simoa disc is used to achieve higher levels of sensitivity and precision and is the first diagnostic consumable whose assay technology is based on optical disc formats by Sony DADC.

University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Licensing Deals Fuel Local Life Sciences Community

University of Maryland (UM) Ventures recently announced agreements between University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and five different life sciences companies across the Baltimore/Washington metropolitan region. The companies include Montgomery County-based Rexahn Pharmaceuticals, Baltimore County-based Plasmonix, Prince Georges County-based IGI Technologies, Howard County-based A&G Pharmaceuticals, and Frederick County-based BioAssay Works. These deals are part of UM Ventures’ continual efforts to accelerate technology commercialization, advance industry collaboration, and support projects with commercial value at both the Baltimore and College Park campuses of the university.

“UMB is very excited to collaborate with these companies, each an innovator in its own right,” said Phil Robilotto, Assistant Vice President, Office of Technology Transfer, UMB. “These types of collaborations are at the core of our mission to channel the expertise of our industry partners and highlight our efforts to support the Maryland biotechnology community.”

UMB/Rexahn Exclusive License Agreement: In June 2013, UMB and Rexahn Pharmaceuticals, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing the next generation of cancer drugs, executed an exclusive license agreement for a novel drug delivery platform, Nano-Polymer-Drug Conjugate Systems (NPDCS), which was co-developed by researchers with the University of Maryland (UM) School of Pharmacy in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, including Assistant Professor Anjan Nan, Ph.D. Rexahn’s platform uses existing chemotherapeutic agents, delivering them directly into cancer tumors. The UMB/Rexahn collaboration began after the company and a team of UMB researchers received a Maryland
Industrial Partnership (MIPS) award. The MIPS program is aimed at technology acceleration, providing funds that are matched by Maryland companies to support university-based research.

UMB/Plasmonix License Agreement: Also in June 2013, UMB entered into a license agreement with Plasmonix for a pathogen detection technology. Plasmonix focuses on the enhancement of luminescent signals through advanced use of metal nanoparticles, applying its technology in life science and diagnostic assays. Joseph Lakowicz, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology within the UM School of Medicine, invented the licensed UMB technology. His laboratory focuses on advancement of fluorescence compositions and methods for use in both research and commercial applications.

UMB Option Agreements with IGI Technologies/A&G Pharmaceuticals: UMB also executed option agreements (giving each company the exclusive right to evaluate a university technology for a short period of time prior to executing a full license agreement) during June 2013 with IGI Technologies and A&G Pharmaceuticals, both university start-ups, although at different stages of company development. Founded by Raj Shekhar, Ph.D., and William Plishker, Ph.D., former UM School of Medicine researchers from the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, IGI Technologies is an emerging start-up developing high-speed medical image registration technology through a Phase II Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A&G Pharmaceuticals, which was founded as a UMB startup in 2007, is discovering and developing theranostics (drug/test combinations) that improve screening, detection, and treatment of cancer. The company also offers custom antibody development through its service division – Precision AntibodyTM. UMB’s option agreement with A&G Pharmaceuticals is to explore the potential for the company’s development of a new cancer diagnostic test based on the tissue biomarker research of lead inventor Yun Qiu, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology, UM School of Medicine.

UMB/BioAssay Works Commercial Evaluation and Option Agreement: In September 2012, UMB entered into a commercial evaluation and option agreement with BioAssay Works to evaluate a Staph aureus diagnostic technology based on the work of lead inventor, Mark E. Shirtliff, Associate Professor, Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, with a dual appointment in UM Schools of Dentistry and Medicine. Dr. Shirtliff studies bacterial biofilms, a mode of growth where pathogens such as Staph aureus become resistant to conventional therapy. He was
awarded the 2013 BioMaryland LIFE Prize for his promising Staph vaccine work. BioAssay Works focuses on antibody-based and antigen-based detection technologies, and on their application in lateral-flow immunoassay. The partnership between BioAssay Works and UMB may lead to the development of a rapid and sensitive test for Staph, in particular the treatment-resistant type (“MRSA”).

Since UM Ventures launched in 2012, the University has helped faculty entrepreneurs manage and commercialize their discoveries, and has helped student entrepreneurs participate in and lead real-world early-stage business ventures. UMB and UMCP startups include a wide range of success stories. UM Ventures provides resources, funding, and expertise to help startups bring innovative technologies to the market.

Source: University of Maryland