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Exosome Diagnostics Enters Collaboration Agreement with Lilly for Exosome Blood-Based Biomarker Discovery

Exosome Diagnostics recently announced it has entered into a collaboration agreement with Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) for biomarker discovery and validation using Exosome Diagnostics proprietary EXO50 nucleic acid extraction kit. Under the agreement, Lilly will gain early access to Exosome Diagnostics technology to help identify key gene mutations and expression levels in blood that may be correlated with drug response and disease recurrence. Financial terms were not disclosed.

“Exosome Diagnostics technology may provide a unique opportunity to gain insight into the biology of complex conditions such as cancer and immune disorders,” said Andrew Schade, senior medical director, diagnostic and experimental pathology at Lilly. “Exosome technology enables biofluid molecular sampling and the ability to monitor disease progression in real time. As Lilly explores new ways to pursue patient tailoring, we’ll continue to work with partners to expand our capabilities.”

“Accessing high quality messenger and microRNA directly from frozen patient fluid samples offers a rapid, cost-effective route to identify and validate biomarkers, which may be correlated with drug response and disease recurrence,” said James McCullough, chief executive officer of Exosome Diagnostics. “Lilly has accumulated an extensive and well annotated clinical blood sample biobank that provides a unique opportunity to track target biomarkers through the clinical trial process and help overcome the limitations of stored biopsy tissue.”

Exosomes and other microvesicles are secreted by all cells into all biofluids, and provide a natural biological packaging and distribution mechanism for RNA and DNA. Exosome Diagnostics’ rapid exosome isolation and extraction technology produces high-quality RNA and DNA, including full length mRNA and microRNA, from small volumes of patient biofluids, such as blood (serum and plasma), urine and cerebrospinal fluid, for analysis by standard PCR, array and sequencing instruments. Analysis can be performed on fresh or frozen fluid samples, allowing for broad, flexible and convenient analyses of clinical trial samples, both in real-time and retrospectively, with no special preservation methods required. Exosomes and their protected nucleic acid contents are being investigated in a broad range of diseases including cancer, CNS disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, maternal/fetal medicine, and chronic kidney disease, among others. In July, QIAGEN and Exosome Diagnostics signed an agreement for the creation of High-Performance Biofluid Sample Preparation Kits for Personalized Healthcare Research which covers the exclusive supply of these products upon availability in 2014.

Source: Exosome Diagnostics

Brain Inflammation Linked to More Severe Parkinson’s Symptoms

Reversing inflammation in the fluid surrounding the brain’s cortex may provide a solution to the complex riddle of Parkinson’s, according to researchers who have found a link between pro-inflammatory biomarkers and the severity of symptoms such as fatigue, depression and anxiety in patients with the chronic disease.

Lena Brundin of Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine was part of a research team that measured inflammatory markers found in cerebrospinal fluid samples of Parkinson’s patients and members of a control group.

“The degree of neuroinflammation was significantly associated with more severe depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment even after controlling for factors such as age, gender and disease duration,” said Brundin, an associate professor in the college and a researcher with the Van Andel Institute.

“By investigating associations between inflammatory markers and non-motor symptoms we hope to gain further insight into this area, which in turn could lead to new treatment options.”

The results of the study were published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.

Inflammation in the brain long has been suspected to be involved in the development of Parkinson’s disease, specifically in non-motor symptoms such as depression, fatigue and cognitive impairment. Recent research suggests inflammation could drive cell death and that developing new drugs that target this inflammation might slow disease progression.

Parkinson´s disease is the second most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system; the causes of the disease and its development are not yet fully understood.

“The few previous studies investigating inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s patients have been conducted on comparatively small numbers of subjects, and often without a healthy control group for comparison,” Brundin said.

In the study, 87 Parkinson’s patients were enrolled between 2008 and 2012. For the control group, 37 individuals were recruited. Participants underwent a general physical exam and routine blood screening. Researchers looked at the following markers: C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, eotaxin, interferon gamma-induced protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β.

The study was carried out in collaboration with researchers from Lund University in Sweden, Skåne University Hospital in Sweden and the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Florida.

Study: Cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers in Parkinson’s disease – Associations with depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment [Brain, Behavior, and Immunity]

Source: EurekAlert!

BIDMC Cardiovascular Institute Researchers Will Lead $4 Million NIH Grant to Study MicroRNAs

A cardiovascular research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), led by BIDMC Principal Investigator Saumya Das, MD, PhD, has been awarded a $4 million Common Fund grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of a newly formed program on Extracellular RNA Communication. The five-year grant will focus on identifying microRNA biomarkers in heart disease.

Each year, complications from heart attacks (myocardial infarctions) contribute to more than half a million cases of heart failure and 300,000 cases of sudden cardiac arrest, when the heart suddenly stops. Both of these conditions are closely related to a process known as remodeling, in which the structure and function of the heart changes – or remodels — following a heart attack.

“Our goal is to explore the role that microRNAs play in predicting which heart-attack patients will go on to experience complications,” explains Das, an electrophysiologist in BIDMC’s Cardiovascular Institute and co-director of the cardiovascular genetics program within the Outpatient Cardiovascular Clinic.

“Current strategies used to identify the highest risk patients have often been inaccurate,” he adds. “We think that a blood test that makes use of microRNA biomarkers could replace existing strategies and more accurately predict which patients might experience poor outcomes and thereby identify who would most benefit from frequent monitoring and medical care.” Other investigators who are part of the NIH grant, “Plasma miRNA Predictors of Adverse Mechanical and Electrical Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction,” include BIDMC Director of Cardiovascular Research Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, and BWH investigators Raymond Y. Kwong, MD, MPH, and Mark Sabatine, MD, MPH.

microRNAs are one type of extracellular RNA. Once considered nothing more than genomic “junk,” microRNAs have more recently been recognized as playing a key role in cellular functions. Several years ago, scientists began to recognize that these small, noncoding RNAs were not only found inside cells, but could also be found in blood and other tissue fluids.

Using patient plasma samples from extensively characterized patients who have suffered heart attacks, the scientific team will first identify which specific microRNAs are related to poor heart remodeling. They will then use cell culture and animal models of heart disease to further prioritize which microRNAs play a functional role in disease progression. Finally, the investigators will validate these prioritized microRNAs as prognostic markers for poor health outcomes after heart attacks in a large prospective clinical trial.

“Ultimately, we think that miRNA-based tests could replace current tests to predict which patients might be at risk of complications and, therefore, be good candidates to receive an implanted defibrillator,” says Das. “At the same time, we hope to be able to better predict which individuals are at less risk of complications – and thereby spare them unnecessary and costly procedures.”

Source: EurekAlert!

MentisCura to Deploy EEG Diagnostics for Dementia at China’s Largest Geriatric Hospital in 2014

MentisCura Diagnostics (www.mentiscura.com) and WanJiaYuan International Geriatric Hospital recently announced the signing of an agreement to implement MentisCura’s proprietary diagnostic tools to improve care for patients with CNS disorders.

Mentiscura’s diagnostics will be part of a state-of-the art technology suite being deployed at the WanJiaYuan International Geriatric Hospital, expected to open in June 2014. The hospital, based in Nanyang in the Henan province, will be a 120,000 square meter, 1200 bed campus, one of the largest facilities of its kind in the world to focus solely on setting new standards of quality of managed care for the elderly, with at least 200 beds dedicated to dementia patients. WanJiaYuan International Geriatric Hospital also aims to establish a leadership position in geriatric research through the development of a center of excellence attracting over 100 international experts.

“We are honoured to be associated with a project that is of an unprecedented scale, even by international standards. The high-throughput and non-invasive nature of our electrophysiological analysis makes it uniquely useful in a real world clinical setting, where physicians need to assess patients and make care decisions before these diseases have reached a late and untreatable stage. From a five-minute standard EEG recording, our powerful analytical systems are able to provide immediate diagnostic output, offering genuine clinical benefit and scalability for even the largest facilities,” said Kristinn Gretarsson, CEO of MentisCura.

“Our hospital is committed to addressing the growing burden of care associated with diseases of ageing. We are delighted to be collaborating with MentisCura to use its innovative clinical technologies to guide earlier, lower cost diagnosis. We believe that biomarkers of disease will increasingly play an important role in our diagnostic protocol for dementia, as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment efficacy,” commented Dr. Jin-Jing Pei, MD, Chief Physician at WanJiaYuan International Geriatric Hospital.

MentisCura offers a complete, integrated service to hospitals and general practitioners through sampling, processing and analysis of patient EEG data. The MentisCura Analysis System is a CE marked diagnostic aid, based on advanced, proprietary EEG-biomarker technology platform that accurately correlates changes in electrophysiology to specific disease pathologies, based on the company’s comprehensive proprietary EEG database for dementia and cognitive disorders. The platform supports diagnoses for most common types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body dementia.

Source: MentisCura Diagnostics

Comprehensive Parkinson’s Biomarker Test Has Prognostic and Diagnostic Value, Penn Medicine Team Reports

Perelman School of Medicine researchers at the University of Pennsylvania report the first biomarker results reported from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI), showing that a comprehensive test of protein biomarkers in spinal fluid have prognostic and diagnostic value in early stages of Parkinson’s disease. The study is reported in JAMA Neurology.

Compared to healthy adults, the study found that people with early Parkinson’s had lower levels of amyloid beta, tau and alpha synuclein in their spinal fluid. In addition, those with lower concentrations of tau and alpha synuclein had greater motor dysfunction. And early Parkinson’s patients with low levels of amyloid beta and tau were more likely to be classified as having the postural instability-gait disturbance- dominant (PIGD) motor type of disease, where falling, freezing, and walking difficulty are common.

“Biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease such as these could help us diagnose patients earlier, and we’ve now shown that the simultaneous measurement of a variety of neurodegenerative disease proteins is valuable,” said study senior author Leslie M. Shaw, PhD, professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Penn Medicine. Dr. Shaw and John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, director of the Penn Udall Center for Parkinson’s Research, are co-leaders of the Bioanalytics Core for the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative, an international observational clinical study sponsored by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

The team evaluated spinal fluid collected from baseline visits of the first 102 PPMI participants – 63 with early, untreated Parkinson’s disease and 39 healthy controls. The spinal fluid was evaluated for levels of five biomarkers: amyloid beta, total tau, phosphorylated tau, alpha synuclein and the ratio of total tau to amyloid beta. Spinal fluid measures of amyloid and tau are currently used in research to distinguish Alzheimer’s disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. In contrast to Alzheimer’s, where tau levels are higher than healthy controls, the study found that early Parkinson’s patients had lower levels of tau than healthy controls. One reason, researchers suggest, could be that interactions between tau and alpha synuclein may limit the release of tau into the cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s patients.

“Through PPMI, we are hoping to identify subgroups of Parkinson’s patients whose disease is likely to progress at a different rate, as early as possible,” said Dr. Trojanowski. “Early prediction is critical, for both motor and dementia symptoms.”

The Parkinson’s PIGD motor subtype has been associated with a more rapid cognitive decline as well as greater functional disability. Using the biomarker test, this initial study found that levels of all spinal fluid biomarkers were lower in the PIGD motor subtype than other types of PD as well as healthy controls. In addition, amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau were at lower levels in the PIGD motor subtype, but were no different in tremor or indeterminate subtypes compared to normal controls.

This spinal fluid testing procedure is only being used in research studies, and will be continued to be evaluated and validated in a larger study of the PPMI cohorts.

In addition to leading the Bioanalytics Core of PPMI, Penn’s Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center is one of the two dozen trial sites where volunteers are evaluated throughout the PPMI study. The Penn PDMDC has been part of the PPMI group studying people with early Parkinson’s disease as well as healthy adults since 2010, and began enrollment for a new, pre-symptomatic arm of the study in the summer of 2013. The pre-motor arm of PPMI is enrolling participants who do not have Parkinson’s disease and are living with one of three potential risk factors for PD: a reduced sense of smell (hyposmia); rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD; a disorder in which the individual acts out his/her dreams); or a mutation in the LRRK2 gene (the single greatest genetic contributor to PD known to date).

“In addition to biomarker tests, validating risk factors could enable earlier detection of the disease and open new avenues in the quest for therapies that could slow or stop disease progression,” said PPMI trial site study leader Matthew Stern, MD, professor of Neurology and director of Penn’s Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center.

Study: Association of Cerebrospinal Fluid β-Amyloid 1-42, T-tau, P-tau181, and α-Synuclein Levels With Clinical Features of Drug-Naive Patients With Early Parkinson Disease [JAMA Neurology]

Source: Penn Medicine