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Study Finds a Diet Rich in Slowly Digested Carbs Reduces Markers of Inflammation in Overweight and Obese Adults

Among overweight and obese adults, a diet rich in slowly digested carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes and other high-fiber foods, significantly reduces markers of inflammation associated with chronic disease, according to a new study by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Such a “low-glycemic-load” diet, which does not cause blood-glucose levels to spike, also increases a hormone that helps regulate the metabolism of fat and sugar. These findings are published online ahead of the February print issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

George Washington University Researchers Receive NCI Award to Study Cancer from a Neglected Tropical Disease

Researchers from The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) have been awarded a five-year, $500,000-per-year R01 grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This award will support investigations by SMHS researchers who are developing proteomic biomarkers for Opisthorchis-induced bile duct cancer. The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a food-borne parasite that currently infects more than 40 million people, primarily in the Southeast Asian countries of Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, where uncooked fish, intermediate hosts for O. viverrini, are a staple of the diet. O. viverrini is considered among the most important of the food-borne trematodes due to its strong association with bile duct fibrosis and bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma) as determined by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). IARC categorizes this parasitic worm as a Group 1 carcinogen – a definitive cause of cancer.

Non-human Sugar Molecule May be a Potential Cancer Biomarker and Treatment

According to researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, a non-human sugar molecule commonly found in people may be useful as a future biomarker for predicting cancer risk. Moreover, the potential biomarker may be useful for diagnosing cancer cases early and, in sufficient concentration, used as a treatment for suppressing tumor growth. The study is published in the April 19 online issue of the journal Cancer Research.

Five Metabolite Levels May Improve Risk Prediction for Diabetes

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) recently identified five amino acids whose levels indicated an increased diabetes risk in a general population. Moreover, the biomarkers could differentiate, among individuals with traditional risk factors such as obesity, those most likely to actually develop diabetes. The findings are published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Pacific Biomarkers Poised to Join Battle Against Sharp Rise in Diabetes Cases Projected for the Year 2050 by Centers for Disease Control

Pacific Biomarkers, Inc., a provider of biomarker laboratory services to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostics industries, has responded to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control projecting that as many as one in three adult Americans may suffer diabetes symptoms by the year 2050.