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Aseptika Awarded UK Patent for Home Test for Lung Infections

Aseptika recently announced that it has been granted a patent in the UK protecting its invention for a test for lung infections, designed to be used by patients at home and by clinicians at the bedside of patients in hospitals. With this new test, vulnerable patients with long-term conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Asthma, can keep a check on their health by measuring the activity of pathogenic bacteria in their lungs with a simple test using a sample of sputum.

COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium Making Strides with Plasma Fibrinogen as New Biomarker

The COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) recently announced at the European Respiratory Society Annual Congress that it has submitted a Qualification Package to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for plasma fibrinogen as a new drug development tool. The Qualification Package is the result of progressive discussions between the FDA’s Qualification Review Team and the CBQC. The CBQC looks forward to the results of FDA review while planning for a fall 2013 submission to the European Medicines Agency.

Dr. Ruth Tal-Singer, CBQC co-chair, vice president, Clinical Discovery, Respiratory Area Therapy Unit at GlaxoSmithKline, notes, “To the best of CBQC’s knowledge, fibrinogen is the first clinical biomarker achieving this milestone in the U.S. This is a major milestone for the CBQC, and it highlights the power of working together across multiple companies, academic centers and government organizations to achieve our common objective of improving the way we study novel medicines for patients who need them.”

To support the submission, the CBQC compiled a unique database of subjects from five individual studies, allowing integrated analyses to support two proposed uses as a prognostic biomarker to enrich clinical trial populations with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) subjects at increased risk for all-cause mortality or COPD exacerbations.

A biomarker is a tool that can be used for early detection of a disease, selection of subjects for clinical trials or as an outcome for clinical trials. Fibrinogen, a protein that can be measured in the blood, is a promising biomarker which identifies a group representing 25 to 30 percent of all COPD patients (a COPD subtype).

Dr. Stephen Rennard, CBQC co-chair and Larson Professor of Medicine, University of Nebraska, adds, “COPD is extremely heterogeneous. This complicates development of new treatments, as individual COPD patients may respond differently. Fibrinogen has been submitted to the FDA as a tool that will help address this problem. Specifically, fibrinogen measurement can help identify COPD patients at risk for death or hospitalization, which can allow individuals to participate in studies of novel treatments designed to improve those outcomes.”

The CBQC, organized under the auspices of the COPD Foundation, is a public-private partnership among academic researchers, pharmaceutical companies and government parties and agencies.

John W. Walsh, president and co-founder, COPD Foundation, states, “The Consortium is providing a unique and productive opportunity to bring new drug development tools to the research community, with the ultimate goal of providing new treatments to patients who urgently need them.”

The CBQC Fibrinogen Working Group is composed of the following members:

  • Bruce Miller, industry co-chair, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ruth Tal-Singer, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Mike Lowings, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Ubaldo Martin, AstraZeneca
  • Jeff Snyder, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Kay Tetzlaff, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Armin Furtwaengler, Boehringer-Ingelheim
  • Nicholas Locantore, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Nancy Leidy, Evidera
  • Amber Martin, Evidera
  • Jason Simeone, Evidera
  • David Mannino, academic co-chair, University of Kentucky
  • Stephen Rennard, University of Nebraska
  • David Lomas, University College London, U.K.
  • Jorgen Vestbo, University of Southern Denmark, University Hospital Manchester, U.K.
  • Graham Barr, Columbia University
  • Debora Merrill, COPD Foundation

Source: COPD Foundation

Low Levels of Serum Bilirubin Spell Higher Lung Cancer Risk for Male Smokers

Elevated levels of bilirubin in the blood get attention in the clinic because they often indicate that something has gone wrong with the liver. Now researchers have found that male smokers with low levels of the yellow-tinged chemical are at higher risk for lung cancer and dying from the disease.

A team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported its findings in a late-breaking abstract at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013 in Washington, D.C.

“Our study indicates male smokers with low levels of bilirubin are a high-risk group that can be targeted with smoking cessation help, low-dose spiral CT screening of their lungs and other preventive measures,” said senior author Xifeng Wu, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of MD Anderson’s Department of Epidemiology and the Betty B. Marcus Chair in Cancer Prevention.

Lung cancer usually is diagnosed at a late stage, when tumors are inoperable and treatments largely ineffective. The overall five-year survival rate is 15 percent, but it falls to 5 percent for stage 3 lung cancer patients and 1 percent for those with stage 4 disease.

Spiral CT scans catch cancer early, biomarker could reduce false positives

The National Lung Screening Trial found that low-dose spiral computed tomography screening reduces mortality among heavy smokers by 20 percent. However, 95 percent of growths found by spiral CT are false positives, a barrier to large-scale screening.

“Validated biomarkers are urgently needed to improve risk prediction for lung cancer and to reduce false positives, shifting the balance toward more effective and efficient CT screening for cancer detection,” Wu said.

The researchers started with an objective analysis of levels of metabolites — substances produced during metabolism. Bilirubin is produced during the breakdown of old blood cells.

They analyzed 60 samples divided into three groups known as “trios” — normal controls, early stage and late stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. The top three metabolites were validated in two more groups of 50 and 123 trios.

When bilirubin emerged as the most significant metabolite, another validation study was done in a prospective cohort of 435,985 people with 208,233 men in Taiwan.

Men were divided into four groups according to their serum bilirubin levels. Lower bilirubin level was associated with significantly higher rates of both lung cancer incidence and mortality.

In the Taiwanese cohort, the incidence rate per 10,000 person-years in men was 7.02 for those in the lowest bilirubin quartile (.68 mg/dL or less), compared to 3.73 in the highest quartile of bilirubin level (1.12 mg/dL or more). The mortality rate per 10,000 person-years was 4.84 for the lowest level compared with 2.46 in the highest bilirubin quartile.

Next step: Establish a risk prediction model in heavy smokers

Bilirubin makes sense as a protective agent because of its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. “It’s plausible that bilirubin protects against lung cancer by scavenging free radicals and carcinogens associated with smoking,” said study presenter Fanmao Zhang, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology.

Indeed, a Belgian study showed that bilirubin in the high normal range lowered cancer mortality in men. A study in the United Kingdom showed higher bilirubin levels in the normal range were associated with lower risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and all-cause mortality. Neither of those studies stratified their analysis of bilirubin by smoking status.

“We expected that bilirubin might be protective, but our finding that bilirubin levels affect only smokers was somewhat of a surprise,” Wu said. “Our discovery that low levels increase lung cancer risk is unique.”

Smokers in the two middle cohorts of bilirubin levels also had higher lung cancer risk than those in the highest quartile. As an objective risk index for lung cancer and all-cause mortality, low levels of bilirubin should send an urgent message to quit smoking, said Chi Pang Wen, M.D., Ph.D., co-lead author from National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan.

The next step, Wu said, is to evaluate the predictive value of serum bilirubin in heavy smokers and to establish a risk prediction model that incorporates bilirubin and other biomarkers with clinical and epidemiological data to improve the efficiency of lung cancer risk prediction.

Source: EurekAlert!

Time to Breathe a Sigh of Relief

British Columbia is facing a healthcare funding challenge and two of the major drivers contributing to it are emphysema and bronchitis, known together as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Exacerbations of COPD, or ‘lung attacks’, are currently the leading cause of emergency room visits and hospitalizations among chronic disease sufferers in BC, and across the country. Such lung attacks are also costly to the healthcare system, accounting for over $5.7 billion in direct, and $6.7 billion for indirect, healthcare costs every year in Canada.

Biomarkers: New Tools of Modern Medicine

Over the last few decades there has been an explosion in the discovery of biomarkers for diagnosis, disease monitoring, and prognostic evaluation. In the April issue of Translational Research, entitled “Biomarkers: New Tools of Modern Medicine,” an international group of medical experts explores the promise and challenges of biomarker discovery and highlights the latest advances in the use of biomarkers in various diseases.