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Ganymed Pharmaceuticals Announces CE Marking for Test to Assess Claudin-18.2 Expression in Solid Tumors

Ganymed Pharmaceuticals announced today that it has fully developed and obtained CE marking for its in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test CLAUDETECTTM18.2 which allows to assess the expression levels of Claudin-18.2 (CLDN18.2) in solid tumors. CLAUDETECTTM18.2, which was developed in collaboration with Theracode GmbH, is now compliant with the requirements of European Community Directive 98/79/EC on in vitro diagnostic medical devices.

GW Researchers Discover Biomarker for Advanced Bile Duct Fibrosis and Bile Duct Cancer

GW Researchers, Jeffrey M. Bethony, Ph.D., associate professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, and Paul Brindley, Ph.D., professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, along with colleagues from Khon Kaen University in Thailand have determined that plasma Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are an sensitive and specific biomarker for the detection of the advanced bile duct fibrosis and bile duct cancer that comes from chronic infection with the Asian Liver Fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini). The research, titled, “Elevated Plasma IL-6 Associates with Increased Risk of Advanced Fibrosis and Cholangiocarcinoma in Individuals Infected by Opisthorchis viverrini,” was recently published in the journal, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

George Washington University Researchers Receive NCI Award to Study Cancer from a Neglected Tropical Disease

Researchers from The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) have been awarded a five-year, $500,000-per-year R01 grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This award will support investigations by SMHS researchers who are developing proteomic biomarkers for Opisthorchis-induced bile duct cancer. The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a food-borne parasite that currently infects more than 40 million people, primarily in the Southeast Asian countries of Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, where uncooked fish, intermediate hosts for O. viverrini, are a staple of the diet. O. viverrini is considered among the most important of the food-borne trematodes due to its strong association with bile duct fibrosis and bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma) as determined by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). IARC categorizes this parasitic worm as a Group 1 carcinogen – a definitive cause of cancer.