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So My Brain Amyloid Level is “Elevated”—What Does That Mean?

Testing drugs to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia and using them in the clinic will mean identifying and informing adults who have a higher risk of Alzheimer’s but are still cognitively normal. A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has shed light on how seniors cope with such information.

Tau Shalt Not Return to Play

This January, former New York Jets defensive end Mark Gastineau told a radio show host that he had been diagnosed with dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Parkinson’s Disease. The Jets all-time leader in sacks said he believes his ailments were caused by playing football. The revelations came just a few weeks before the Super Bowl, the most widely viewed event in sports.

New Biomarker Predicts Alzheimer’s Disease and Link to Diabetes

An enzyme found in the fluid around the brain and spine is giving researchers a snapshot of what happens inside the minds of Alzheimer’s patients and how that relates to cognitive decline.

Iowa State University researchers say higher levels of the enzyme, autotaxin, significantly predict memory impairment and Type 2 diabetes. Just a one-point difference in autotaxin levels – for example, going from a level of two to a three – is equal to a 3.5 to 5 times increase in the odds of being diagnosed with some form of memory loss, said Auriel Willette, an assistant professor of food science and human nutrition at Iowa State.

Cytox Announces Participation in INSIGHT Alzheimer’s Study

Cytox Ltd, an innovative developer of assays for risk assessment and prediction of dementia, has confirmed its participation in the pioneering French INSIGHT study of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The Cytox proposal, ‘Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Profiling as an Approach to Risk Stratification for Future Cognitive Decline in Elderly Subjective Memory Complainers’, has been reviewed and approved by the INSIGHT Scientific Committee.

Researchers Close in on a Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Disease, Giving Physicians Hope for Slowing Symptoms Through Preclinical Detection

Researchers from the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine are nearing development of a blood test that can accurately detect the presence of Alzheimer’s disease, which would give physicians an opportunity to intervene at the earliest, most treatable stage.