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Swedish Cancer Institute Elevates Personalized Medicine Program with Innovative Software Platform

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The Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI), one of the Northwest’s leading cancer treatment centers, recently announced the adoption of Syapse Precision Medicine Platform to enhance its Personalized Medicine Program. The innovative software platform will enable clinicians to better integrate genomic information into patient care and move critical cancer research forward.

The Personalized Medicine Program, launched in April 2014, combines advanced treatments based on the “molecular fingerprint” of a tumor with individualized emotional and physical supportive care. SCI’s gene alteration panel, developed in partnership with CellNetix Pathology & Laboratories, is based on a focused set of gene alterations that are most relevant to cancer treatments. By combining gene alteration data with the clinical decision support of the Syapse platform, patients may receive tailored therapies or targeted clinical trials specific to their molecular fingerprint instead of treatments based solely on the origin of their cancer.

“SCI’s Personalized Medicine Program bridges the gap between community-based care and cutting-edge research by offering genomics-driven treatment to all eligible cancer patients, not just those who have failed second or third lines of therapy,” said Thomas Brown, M.D., Executive Director of the Swedish Cancer Institute. “SCI plans to enroll 9,000 patients in the program during its first three years, and the Syapse platform will be instrumental in advancing this work.”

Syapse Precision Medicine Platform enables the use of large-scale genomic and clinical data to support the patient’s whole cancer care journey, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment and well-being (survivorship). This platform integrates with SCI’s enterprise electronic medical record and allows the treatment team to mine patient data and research results to identify which treatments work best for tumors with particular gene alterations. The platform will include the profiles of thousands of individual tumors, making it one of the largest databases of its kind with direct relevance to and day-to-day impact on cancer care.

The new platform will also help propel SCI’s research program and clinical trials forward. Patients will soon have access to early/Phase I clinical trials at The Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics and Research Unit at the Swedish Cancer Institute. These early trials offer novel agents and therapies to patients for whom standard therapies are not available, or not an option.

For more information about SCI’s Personalized Medicine Program, visit www.swedishcancerinstitute.org.

Source: PR Newswire