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Novel Use of Pressure BioSciences’ Patented PCT Platform Offers New Insights into Protein Structure and Function, New Tool for Biomarker Discovery and Rational Drug Design

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Last month, Pressure BioSciences, Inc. (OTCQB: PBIO) (“PBI” and the “Company”) announced that data supporting important advantages of PBI’s powerful and enabling Pressure Cycling Technology (“PCT”) platform were presented at the 27th Annual Symposium of the Protein Society held July 20-23, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts.

The use of highly sophisticated analytical instrument systems by research scientists worldwide has resulted in a greater understanding of complex biological molecules, including proteins – the “building blocks of life.” One such instrument system, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (“EPR”) spectroscopy, has been shown to provide key information on the structure, flexibility, and function of proteins. This information is crucial to the development of new and better diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.

At this year’s annual Protein Society symposium, researchers from UCLA reported on the development of an improved EPR system based on the use of high pressure. This novel system combined (for the first time ever) two cutting-edge EPR methods: site directed spin labeling (“SDSL”) and double electron-electron resonance (“DEER”). This strategy allowed the investigation of dynamic events in proteins that would be difficult or even impossible to study by conventional EPR technology.

Dr. Wayne L. Hubbell, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Jules Stein Professor of Ophthalmology at UCLA, and senior author of the study, commented: “The study of proteins under pressure by EPR and other spectroscopic techniques, such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (“NMR”), has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of the structure and function of proteins. This information could subsequently provide new insights into such important areas as biomarker discovery and rational drug design, and play an important role in the discovery process that lies ahead in the exciting field of protein science.”

Richard T. Schumacher, President and CEO of PBI, said: “We believe these and other data reported by researchers using pressure-based EPR and NMR systems strongly indicate that PCT can enhance the recovery, detection, and measurement of proteins from a wide variety of samples. In turn, this information has the potential to help accelerate the design and manufacture of new and better diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. We further believe that the advantages of pressure-based spectroscopic methods are just now beginning to be realized by scientists, and that as the body of data continues to grow from high pressure-based spectroscopic studies, that PBI has the potential to become a major provider of high pressure equipment into the exciting and growing spectroscopy area.”

Source: Pressure BioSciences