Quantcast

Industry news that matters to you.  Learn more

Archives for September 2013

Exosome Diagnostics Enters Collaboration Agreement with Lilly for Exosome Blood-Based Biomarker Discovery

Exosome Diagnostics recently announced it has entered into a collaboration agreement with Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) for biomarker discovery and validation using Exosome Diagnostics proprietary EXO50 nucleic acid extraction kit. Under the agreement, Lilly will gain early access to Exosome Diagnostics technology to help identify key gene mutations and expression levels in blood that may be correlated with drug response and disease recurrence. Financial terms were not disclosed.

“Exosome Diagnostics technology may provide a unique opportunity to gain insight into the biology of complex conditions such as cancer and immune disorders,” said Andrew Schade, senior medical director, diagnostic and experimental pathology at Lilly. “Exosome technology enables biofluid molecular sampling and the ability to monitor disease progression in real time. As Lilly explores new ways to pursue patient tailoring, we’ll continue to work with partners to expand our capabilities.”

“Accessing high quality messenger and microRNA directly from frozen patient fluid samples offers a rapid, cost-effective route to identify and validate biomarkers, which may be correlated with drug response and disease recurrence,” said James McCullough, chief executive officer of Exosome Diagnostics. “Lilly has accumulated an extensive and well annotated clinical blood sample biobank that provides a unique opportunity to track target biomarkers through the clinical trial process and help overcome the limitations of stored biopsy tissue.”

Exosomes and other microvesicles are secreted by all cells into all biofluids, and provide a natural biological packaging and distribution mechanism for RNA and DNA. Exosome Diagnostics’ rapid exosome isolation and extraction technology produces high-quality RNA and DNA, including full length mRNA and microRNA, from small volumes of patient biofluids, such as blood (serum and plasma), urine and cerebrospinal fluid, for analysis by standard PCR, array and sequencing instruments. Analysis can be performed on fresh or frozen fluid samples, allowing for broad, flexible and convenient analyses of clinical trial samples, both in real-time and retrospectively, with no special preservation methods required. Exosomes and their protected nucleic acid contents are being investigated in a broad range of diseases including cancer, CNS disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, maternal/fetal medicine, and chronic kidney disease, among others. In July, QIAGEN and Exosome Diagnostics signed an agreement for the creation of High-Performance Biofluid Sample Preparation Kits for Personalized Healthcare Research which covers the exclusive supply of these products upon availability in 2014.

Source: Exosome Diagnostics

Researchers to Identify Genetic Biomarkers for Aggressive Breast Cancer

The Avon Foundation for Women recently awarded a $300,000 grant to Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Surgery and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and a member of the Cancer Biology and Urologic Oncology Research Programs at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute to advance scientific research in aggressive breast cancer.

Di Vizio will collaborate with the Cedars-Sinai Women’s Cancer Program to investigate biomarkers in patient blood samples that may identify individuals with aggressive breast cancer. Biomarkers are genes or other molecules that can indicate a person’s predisposition to specific medical conditions.

Research findings have the potential to create a novel standard of care and a new source of biomarkers. The possible new source of biomarkers, known as large oncosomes, are tumor-derived vesicles that transmit signaling complexes between cell compartments, providing valuable insight into the progression of disease. Findings may also help researchers and clinicians predict the aggressiveness of breast cancer earlier in the diagnostic process.

“This kind of research is the essential foundation to get us to our real goal, which is to improve diagnostic and prognostic capabilities and find effective treatments for breast cancer,” said Di Vizio. “With this study, we hope to identify previously unrecognized large oncosomes as potential biomarkers in advanced tumors that can be visualized, quantified and isolated using methods easily translatable to the clinic.”

Funding from the Avon Foundation for Women, a nonprofit organization and longtime supporter of Cedars-Sinai, will provide an opportunity for researchers to further spearhead new technologies, therapies and surgical interventions that may provide better patient outcomes, beginning at diagnosis.

Working with Di Vizio to provide these advancements is collaborator Beth Y. Karlan, MD, director of the Women’s Cancer Program, director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Chair in Gynecologic Oncology and the director of the Cedars-Sinai Gilda Radner Hereditary Cancer Program.

“I’m excited to be a collaborator on this research study, as it holds promise to provide tangible improvements in earlier diagnostics and detection in aggressive breast cancer and is perfectly aligned with the program goals of the Cedars-Sinai Women’s Cancer Program,” said Karlan. “This Avon Foundation for Women grant will further our program’s commitment to studying cancer biology, developing new approaches to early detection and preventing and improving cancer survival for all patients.”

This is the first study on large oncosomes analyses in patients with breast cancer. Pilot funding for this grant is supported by the Martz Breast Cancer Discovery Fund.

Source: EurekAlert!

NanoString Technologies Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for Prosigna Breast Cancer Prognostic Gene Signature Assay

NanoString Technologies, Inc., (NASDAQ: NSTG) a provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostic products, recently announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Prosigna™ Breast Cancer Prognostic Gene Signature Assay. Based on the PAM50 gene signature, Prosigna is the company’s first FDA-cleared in vitro diagnostic assay and uses the gene expression profile of cells found in breast cancer tissue to assess a patient’s risk of distant recurrence of disease. The Prosigna Assay is performed using the nCounter® Dx Analysis System, which can be placed in qualified laboratories throughout the United States, empowering oncologists and pathologists to quickly and easily meet the testing needs of their breast cancer patients.

“Receipt of FDA 510(k) clearance for Prosigna marks a key milestone for NanoString and is an important step forward in the treatment of breast cancer. This achievement is a testament to the ongoing dedication and professionalism of our team, and the commitment of our collaborators,” said Brad Gray, President and Chief Executive Officer of NanoString Technologies. “Prosigna illustrates our approach of using nCounter technology to translate genomic discoveries into powerful in vitro diagnostic products, and it represents a significant growth opportunity beyond our robust life sciences research business.”

The Prosigna Assay is intended for use as a prognostic indicator for distant recurrence-free survival at 10 years, and is indicated for postmenopausal women with Stage I/II lymph node-negative or Stage II lymph node-positive (one to three positive nodes) hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who have undergone surgery in conjunction with locoregional treatment consistent with standard of care. For each patient, the Prosigna Assay reports the Prosigna Score (referred to as Risk of Recurrence Score, or ROR Score, in the scientific literature, including the TransATAC study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology ) and a risk category based on both the Prosigna Score and nodal status. Node-negative patients are classified as low, intermediate or high risk, while node-positive patients are classified as low or high risk.

Other key features of the Prosigna Breast Cancer Prognostic Gene Signature Assay include:

  • All-in-one assay consumables, including RNA extraction kits, allowing laboratories to test as little as a single section of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue
  • High-throughput workflow allowing each nCounter Dx Analysis System to process up to 30 patient samples per eight hour work day
  • Automated generation of personalized full-color patient reports that can be quickly and easily shared electronically with ordering oncologists

Bruce Seeley, Senior Vice President & General Manager of Diagnostics of NanoString Technologies commented: “We believe that the compelling clinical data, clear patient reporting, and unique delivery model position Prosigna for success in the U.S. market. By integrating the Prosigna Assay into existing laboratory workflows, we are offering physicians and patients seamless and timely access to clinical insights and a powerful tool that can aid in making more informed treatment decisions.”

Prosigna-enabled nCounter Dx Analysis Systems are expected to be available for placement in high-complexity Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) certified laboratories late in the fourth quarter of 2013. Prosigna testing services are expected to be available through qualified U.S. clinical laboratories beginning in the first quarter of 2014.

Source: NanoString Technologies

Biomarker Assessment in Suspected ACS Could be Practice-changing: BIC-8 Results

An emergency department strategy that uses two biomarkers to triage patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can increase the rate of early, safe hospital discharge, according to results of the Biomarkers in Cardiology 8 (BIC-8) trial.

“This biomarker strategy using a state-of-the-art quantitative troponin assay in combination with an ultrasensitive copeptin assay has the potential to change clinical practice with high patient safety,” said lead investigator Martin Möckel, MD, PhD, from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in Berlin, Germany.

“This is the first interventional trial to study whether it is safe to discharge suspected ACS patients who test troponin and copeptin negative at admission. Using this strategy, a high proportion of patients could be discharged early, thus unnecessary treatments and resources could be saved, causing a substantial benefit for patients and health care providers.”

Emergency departments worldwide face increasing overcrowding and patients with signs and symptoms which might be caused by an acute coronary syndrome are very common, even though only around 15% of these patients are ultimately diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction as the underlying disease, explained Dr. Möckel.

“Rapid rule-out of acute myocardial infarction (MI) is therefore a major clinical need, saving the health care system time and resources and patients unnecessary stress, anxiety and other risks associated with hospitalization.”

Current guidelines recommend that patients receive serial troponin testing to confirm that hospital discharge is appropriate, but this testing delays definitive action, he said.

“The new biomarker copeptin has been shown to be elevated in patients first presenting with acute MI, and when combined with the cardiac troponin biomarker has an excellent negative predictive value for acute MI. However, an early discharge strategy based on combining these two tests has never been assessed prospectively.”

BIC-8, a multicentre, open, randomized, controlled clinical trial included 902 patients with an initial negative troponin test to assess this strategy.

In the experimental arm (n=451), patients with a negative copeptin test (less than 10 pmol/L) were discharged into ambulant care, with a scheduled outpatient visit within 72 hours, while those with a positive copeptin test received standard treatment according to current guidelines.

Among patients in the standard arm (n=451), copeptin results were not available to treating staff and patients were treated according to current guidelines.

At 30 days of follow-up the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) was similar in both groups (5.46% in the experimental arm vs 5.5% in the standard arm), but emergency room discharge rates were significantly higher in the experimental arm (66% vs 12%; P < 0.001).

The results support the consideration of a new treatment algorithm in low-to-intermediate risk patients with suspected ACS, said Dr. Möckel.

“Patients with a negative troponin and a negative copeptin result at admission can safely be discharged if the final clinical assessment is consistent with this decision, as long as a timely diagnostic work-up is done in the outpatient setting,” he said.

However, the clinical judgment of the treating physician is of utmost importance, he stressed.

“If his or her final clinical assessment excludes discharge due to high suspicion of ACS, perhaps due to recurrent symptoms or an updated history, the patient should not be discharged despite negative biomarker results.”

Source: EurekAlert!

AB SCIEX Proteomics Scientist Wins HUPO 2013 Science and Technology Award

The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) recently awarded Christie Hunter, Ph.D, director of proteomics applications at AB SCIEX, its 2013 Science and Technology Award at an award ceremony during last week’s HUPO 2013 conference in Japan. Dr. Hunter was recognized for her contributions to the development and commercialization of a breakthrough approach for targeted proteomics. The analytical strategy of targeted proteomics was recently named “Method of the Year” by Nature Methods.

Targeted proteomics is a standardized, biological research workflow that focuses on reproducibly quantifying a specific subset of proteins within a sample. It generates data that is vital for biologists to answer hypothesis-driven, biological questions.

A decade ago, proteomics research was dominated by discovery workflows, which provided valuable information on a single sample but lacked the reproducibility to generate robust quantitation across a larger sample set. New innovation was needed at the time to move the field beyond simply producing large lists of identified proteins and toward providing highly quantitative answers.

This led to the development of a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-triggered, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) workflow at AB SCIEX to rapidly create high sensitivity MRM assays to target peptides that are unique to their associated proteins. This workflow was made possible by the combination of triple quadrupole and linear ion trap functionality in a single system called the AB SCIEX QTRAP® System.

Dr. Hunter ‒ in collaboration with researcher Dr. Leigh Anderson, the founder of the Plasma Proteome Institute and head of SISCAPA Assay Technologies ‒ pioneered a workflow that applied MRM to the targeted quantification of proteins and peptides in plasma by mass spectrometry. In their initial publication[1], Dr. Hunter and Dr. Anderson demonstrated that a targeted workflow could be applied to multiplexed quantitation of proteins in human plasma with high reproducibility and high confidence in the results.

The impact of the paper resulted in broad adoption of the MRM technique around the world to accelerate the verification and validation of putative protein biomarkers, generating more than 800 citations, according to Google Scholar. Less than a decade after this important work, most proteomics laboratories today use a triple quadrupole-based mass spectrometer to perform MRM analysis.

“We congratulate Dr. Christie Hunter on receiving such a prestigious award from HUPO in recognition of her significant contributions to the rise of targeted proteomics as a viable technique to advance biomarker research,” said Dave Hicks, Vice President and General Manager of the Pharmaceutical and Academic Business at AB SCIEX.

“Dr. Hunter and her AB SCIEX colleagues continue to participate in exciting collaborations with leading proteomics researchers around the world to drive new innovations in software, chemistries and instrumentation that further expand quantitative proteomics workflows for the growing community of mass spectrometry users at large,” added Hicks.

Currently, Dr. Hunter is playing a pivotal role in the development of higher specificity workflows for targeted protein quantitation to overcome situations where sensitivity is limited by interferences or background. She is involved in the investigation of the utility of differential mobility separations for added selectivity of quantitation of peptides in complex mixtures. She is also working to enhance data-independent acquisition strategies, such as SWATHTM Acquisition, for quantitative proteomics to increase the multiplexing and reproducibility that can be achieved in a single experiment.

Source: AB SCIEX