Quantcast

Industry news that matters to you.  Learn more

Archives for June 2013

Saladax Receives CLIA Laboratory Certification and Approval to Begin Clinical Laboratory Operations in Support of MyCare Portfolio

Saladax Biomedical, Inc., a privately held company developing novel diagnostic tests that individually optimize a patient’s exposure to chemotherapy, today announced it has been certified as a registered CLIA Laboratory from the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality (OCSQ), a division of The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) that regulates laboratory testing performed on humans. The CLIA certification and approval marks a significant milestone for Saladax, allowing the company to begin clinical laboratory operations for the MyCare™ portfolio of products at its facilities located in Bethlehem, PA.

Saladax Biomedical Laboratories (SBL), a division of Saladax Biomedical, Inc., will initially offer testing services for chemotherapy exposure optimization assays including My5-FU™, MyPaclitaxel™ and MyDocetaxel™ in the U.S. SBL’s menu of testing services will expand to include more than a dozen new exposure optimization tests that are currently in development.

“This is a significant milestone for SBL as our CLIA laboratory operations are at the heart of our U.S. commercialization plan that will include an expanding suite of MyCare exposure optimization tests that we believe give cancer patients the edge they need with their therapy,” said Mark Myslinski, SVP and Chief Commercial Officer at Saladax Biomedical, Inc. “The SBL team did an outstanding job preparing our company for this milestone and it is illustrative of their preparedness for the commercial launch of the MyCare portfolio to oncologists in the U.S.”

Beginning on July 1, 2013, SBL will offer testing services for their initial chemotherapy exposure test portfolio, MyPaclitaxelTM, MyDocetaxelTM and the My5-FUTM test (previously OnDose) that is being transitioned from Myriad Laboratories. The MyCare technology platform offers, rapid, robust and cost-effective blood tests for patient-specific chemotherapy dose optimization.

As a simple blood test, MyCare products will provide oncologists with vital information to determine the optimal chemotherapy dose required to maximize effectiveness and limit toxicity for their patients on an individual basis.

About Saladax Biomedical, Inc.
Saladax Biomedical develops novel diagnostic assays for the practical delivery of personalized medicine. The company’s proprietary line of MyCare™ assays improves the efficacy of existing drugs by optimizing the dose administered for each individual patient. The initial focus of Saladax is oncology, with a portfolio of 13 chemotherapy drug assays in various stages of development. The initial portfolio of three assays is currently offered to the oncology community in markets around the world.

The company’s MyCare technology platform is broad and flexible, enabling wide application in many therapeutic categories. This technology also enables Saladax to serve as a valuable partner to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in the development of companion diagnostics (CDx), addressing multiple risks and challenges encountered in drug development.

Headquartered in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Saladax was founded in 2004 and is ISO 13485:2003 certified.

Source: Saladax Biomedical

Life Technologies Launches Compendia Oncomine NGS Power Tools for Cancer Researchers, Discovers Novel Gene Fusions

Life Technologies Corporation (NASDAQ: LIFE) recently announced the introduction of Oncomine® Next Gen Sequencing Power Tools, an analytics offering that will allow cancer researchers to explore results from in-depth analysis of next generation sequencing (NGS) data, including data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. In total, more than 4,500 paired tumor and samples have been analyzed to date.

Cancer Research UK and CRT Collaborate with Abcodia to Discover and Develop Tests for Early Diagnosis of Cancer

Cancer Research UK and its commercial arm, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), have joined forces with Abcodia, the biomarker validation company with a focus on cancer screening, to develop new blood tests to detect a range of cancers when they are still at a very early stage.

The strategic alliance will focus on biomarkers to detect cancers before patients develop symptoms, concentrating on cancers which currently have limited screening tests available, such as non-small cell lung cancer.

Detecting cancer earlier will give doctors the best chance to treat cancer effectively, before the disease develops and spreads when it becomes more difficult to treat. Identifying patients at an early stage will also provide the scientific and pharmaceutical communities with the ability to select patients for the development of a new generation of anti-cancer medicines.

The partnership combines Cancer Research UK’s extensive clinical oncology and scientific network with Abcodia’s expertise in the longitudinal profiling of biomarkers, as well as its exclusive access to one of the world’s largest prospective collections of serum samples available for biomarker research. This collection is derived from the UK Collaborative trial for Ovarian Cancer Screening* (UKCTOCS) run at University College London (UCL) and contains more than five million serum samples. The trial is part funded by Cancer Research UK.

The samples in the collection have been taken from healthy people annually and in many cases, up to 10 years prior to a cancer diagnosis. The collaboration will use these samples to select biomarkers which provide a clear indication of change in the early pre-diagnosis stages of disease.

Cancer Research UK, CRT and Abcodia will seek partnerships in the UK and internationally, with academic and commercial organisations which have leading-edge biomarker technology, to discover, validate and further develop the markers.

Dr Julie Barnes, Abcodia’s CEO, said: “We are delighted to be able to work with Cancer Research UK and CRT in this new global venture. The early diagnosis of cancer has never been more important and with the collective expertise that this alliance can bring, we hope to make a real difference in the field of early cancer detection and screening.”

The alliance is particularly interested in seeking markers that may be expressed in serum; for example, proteins, microRNAs – regulators of gene expression, exosomes ¬– cell-derived vesicles, autoantibodies – antibodies targeting an individual’s own proteins, and DNA methylation – a molecular switch to turn DNA on and off. Both genetic and acquired risk factors will also be investigated.

Abcodia and CRT will jointly commercialise any biomarkers discovered during the collaboration and share revenues resulting from potential licensing deals with additional third parties.

Dr Harpal Kumar, Cancer Research UK’s chief executive, said: “Earlier detection of cancer remains a huge challenge but also a tremendous opportunity. We know that for most types of cancer, the earlier we detect them, the greater the chance of being able to treat them effectively and successfully. Furthermore, treating earlier stage disease is usually associated with fewer side effects from treatment for our patients. The scope and scale of this alliance, aimed at developing new tests for a range of cancers at their earliest stage, before symptoms develop, is very exciting. The combination of expertise formed by this partnership provides a great opportunity to accelerate this vital biomarker research, which we hope will help save thousands of lives from cancer.”

Professor Ian Jacobs, Vice President at the University of Manchester, Principle Investigator of UKCTOCS and an Abcodia founder, said: “I’m delighted that the biobank developed through UKCTOCS will be used for such an important collaborative venture which has potential to yield important discoveries and to benefit patients through early detection across a range of cancers.”

Dr Keith Blundy, Cancer Research Technology’s chief executive, said: “This important alliance combines Cancer Research UK’s clinical expertise, with the commercialisation expertise of both Abcodia and CRT. Together with additional technology partners, we hope to be able to identify early detection biomarkers that will enable patients to be treated as soon as possible, ultimately saving lives.”

Source: Abcodia

Biomarker Identification May Lead to New Noninvasive Test for Colorectal Cancer Detection

The average 5-year survival for colorectal cancer (CRC) is less than 10% if metastasis occurs, but can reach 90% if detected early. A new non-invasive test has been developed that measures methylation of the SDC2 gene in tissues and blood sera. This test detected 87% of all stages of colorectal cancer cases (sensitivity) without significant difference between early and advanced stages, while correctly identifying 95% of disease-free patients (specificity). The results are published in the July issue of The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CRC is the second leading cancer killer in the US affecting both men and women. In 2009, close to 137,000 people in the US were diagnosed with CRC, with close to a 40% mortality rate.

There are other screening choices for CRC, including fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), fecal immunochemical testing, and colonoscopy. Colonoscopy is the gold standard of CRC screening, but patient resistance – mostly due to the unpleasant preparation – has curbed widespread adoption. FOBT is non-invasive but has limited sensitivity, particularly for early disease. A sensitive and specific non-invasive test using blood or stool could to be a more preferable option with the potential of saving many lives.

In their search for a biomarker that could be used for the early detection of CRC, investigators from Genomictree, Inc. and Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea, performed DNA microarray analysis coupled with enriched methylated DNA using tissues from primary tumors and non-tumor tissues from 12 CRC patients. After step-wise filtering, they found a set of genes that were highly methylated across all of the CRC tumors. Ultimately they identified one gene, SDC2, which encodes the membrane syndecan-2 protein, a protein that is known to participate in cell proliferation, cell migration, and is expressed in colon mesenchymal cells. The methylation level of target region of SDC2 assessed in tumor tissue was found to be significantly higher than that from paired adjacent non-tumor tissue.

The next step was to clinically validate the biomarker by analyzing SDC2 methylation levels in primary tumors and paired-adjacent non-tumor tissue samples from 133 CRC patients. Investigators found that in the transcriptional regulatory region of the SDC2 gene, tumor samples showed significantly higher levels of methylation than the control samples. SDC2 methylation positivity ranged from 92.9% to 100% when samples were stratified according to stages of cancer.

Further, investigators found that the SDC2 biomarker could be measured in serum samples from CRC patients and healthy individuals. “The SDC2 methylation test was able to detect 92% for detection of stage I cancer patients indicating that SDC2 is suitable for early detection of CRC where therapeutic interventions have the greatest likelihood of curing the patient from the disease,” says first author TaeJeong Oh, PhD.

The authors suggest that the SDC2 methylation test they describe could possibly be used as an alternative to or in conjunction with colonoscopy. It could also be used to monitor cancer progression and treatment. Dr. Sungwhan An, corresponding author and CEO of Genomictree, Inc., commented: “We are very excited with this result using a small amount of serum DNA from less than 1ml of blood. I believe a greater volume of blood will further improve the clinical performance of this test. We are currently preparing another set of clinical validation studies evaluating SDC2 methylation in serum DNA from patients with early adenoma.” In future research the authors will explore whether this biomarker is specific to CRC or universal among other cancers.

Source: Gnome-Wide Identification and Validation of a Novel Methylation Biomarker, SDC2, for Blood-Based Detection of Colorectal Cancer

Source: EurekAlert!

Two Biomarkers Predict Increased Risk for “Silent” Strokes

Two biomarkers widely being investigated as predictors of heart and vascular disease appear to indicate risk for “silent” strokes and other causes of mild brain damage that present no symptoms, report researchers from The Methodist Hospital and several other institutions in an upcoming issue of Stroke (now online).

The researchers found high blood levels of troponin T and NT-proBNP were associated with as much as 3 and 3.5 times the amount of damaged brain tissue, respectively. The findings are part of the large-scale Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

“The concept of prevention is expanding,” said principal investigator Christie Ballantyne, M.D., director of the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at The Methodist Hospital. “It’s not good enough to simply do a few tests and try to assess risk for heart attack. What we need to do is assess the risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and also asymptomatic disease so we can start preventive efforts earlier. Waiting to correct problems until after a symptomatic stroke may be too late.”

One possible outcome is that patients determined to be in high-risk groups could be started on anti-stroke medications sooner.

In another ARIC paper published two months ago in Stroke, Ballantyne and coauthors reported a strong association between blood levels of troponin T and NT-proBNP and more severe instances of stroke, called symptomatic stroke. The current study looked at the two biomarkers and “subclinical,” asymptomatic events in the brain that are usually caused by a lack of blood flow.

“Taken together, these two papers show the biomarkers are effective at identifying people who are likely to have mild brain disease and stroke well before damage is done,” said Ballantyne, who also is a Baylor College of Medicine professor. “This hopefully will give doctors more time to help patients take corrective steps to protect their brains.”

For the subclinical brain disease study, researchers gleaned data from about 1,100 patient volunteers who agreed to have blood drawn and two MRI scans eleven years apart to look for silent brain infarcts and also white matter lesions (WMLs) caused by chronic inflammation.

Statistical analysis showed a strong relationship between high NTproBNP and the likelihood of brain infarcts and WMLs. Study participants with the highest levels of NT-proBNP had as much as 3.5 times the number of brain infarcts as participants with low NT-proBNP levels, and more WMLs. Those with the highest levels of troponin T had as much as 3.0 times the number of brain infarcts and more WMLs.

The protein troponin T is part of the troponin complex and its presence is often used to diagnose recent heart attacks. NT-proBNP is an inactive peptide fragment left over from the production of brain natiuretic peptide (BNP), a small neuropeptide hormone that has been shown to have value in diagnosing recent and ongoing congestive heart failure.

“The highly sensitive troponin T test we used is not approved for general clinical use in the US yet, but the NT-proBNP test is just now starting to be used more widely beyond making a diagnosis for heart failure,” Ballantyne said.

The Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention is part of the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center.

Also contributing to this study were Razvan Dadu, Salim Virani, Vijay Nambi, and Ron Hoogeveen (Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention), Myriam Fornage and Eric Boerwinkle (University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston), Alvaro Alonso (University of Minnesota School of Public Health), Rebecca Gottesman (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), and Thomas Mosley (University of Mississippi Medical Center). It was funded with grants from NHLBI and NIH, while Roche Applied Science helped fund the development of diagnostic technology.

Stroke is published by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

Source: Cardiovascular Biomarkers and Subclinical Brain Disease in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

Source: Troponin T, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and incidence of stroke: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

Source: The Methodist Hospital System