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Archives for September 2010

$9.1 Million Grant To Improve Drug Therapy Using Gene Profiles

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences has awarded a $9.1 million, five-year grant to The Ohio State University for a study titled “Expression Genetics in Drug Therapy.” The goal of the research is to enhance drug response rates and reduce the number of adverse drug reactions among patients taking medication.

Penn Researchers Receive $12 Million NIH Grant to Develop Personalized Approach to Smoking Cessation

A variety of smoking cessation treatments are currently available for the more than 18 million adult Americans try to quit smoking each year, but success rates vary widely. Despite the importance of quitting smoking, more personalized approaches to smoking cessation treatment are needed to help smokers pick the right method that will work best for them. A major new personalized medicine clinical trial, led by addiction researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, will study how a smokers’ genetic make-up influences their quitting success.

Immunogenicity Testing Proves Invaluable

Immunogenicity is a measure of the immune response to a biotherapeutic drug. It is a very relevant issue affecting not only the use of therapeutic protein drugs such as mAbs but also peptides, enzymes, cytokines, growth factors, recombinant proteins, and other biological products.

Michael J. Fox: Keep funding stem cell research

Biomedical research is complicated. For patients, the pace of progress can be frustratingly slow. Two announcements last month — one about biomarkers, the other about stem cell research — left many of us feeling that for every promising discovery, there are even greater setbacks.

Plavix Biomarker Test Can Improve Patient Outcomes

In January, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) released “Outpatient Prescription Anticoagulants Utilization and Expenditures for the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population Age 18 and Older 2007,” a study from its October 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). This report found that anticoagulant drugs were prescribed to more than 4.2 million Americans at a cost of $900 million and were paid for by patients and/or third-party payers.