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Archives for September 2010

Simple Blood Test May Detect Alzheimer’s: TTUHSC Researcher Featured in JAMA

The September issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals, features research, which finds that a simple blood test could diagnose Alzheimer’s disease.

Diaceutics and London Genetics Partner to Accelerate Biomarker Development in the Global Biopharmaceutical Industry

Diaceutics Limited (http://www.diaceutics.com) and London Genetics Limited, an expert in the use of pharmacogenetics in clinical drug discovery and development, today announce a strategic partnership to develop software decision tools that will provide biopharmaceutical companies with rapid and extensive access to the world’s leading academic biomarker research groups. The new tools will enable commercial biomarker research teams to comprehensively explore global biomarker resources to identify genes and gene sequences, as well as the researchers and clinicians relevant to their targeted therapy research.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop New Computational Method to Aide Analysis of Gene Expression Experiments

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have developed a new computational method that will help streamline the analysis of gene expression experiments and provide scientists with a better mechanistic understanding of the differences between diseased and normal cells. The new database and software, called ChIP Enrichment Analysis (ChEA), will revolutionize how researchers identify drug targets and biomarkers. Researchers can find the tool online at http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/lib/chea.jsp. The data are published in Bioinformatics.

Paper Demonstrates New Top-Down Approach for Identifying Low Abundance Biomarkers

A recent article in Proteomics Clinical Applications demonstrates the validity of a new top-down proteomics approach to identifying low-abundance biomarkers in the one percent of serum/plasma proteins known as the deep proteome. Applying this methodology, French researchers identified a potential biomarker that might be used to track a patient’s recovery from a myocardial infarction (heart attack). Specifically, their goal was to develop indicators that would more accurately predict a complex process called “left ventricular remodeling” that occurs in response to heart damage and leads to heart failure.

Blood Test Accurately Predicts Death from Prostate Cancer up to 25 Years in Advance

A blood test at the age of 60 can accurately predict the risk that a man will die from prostate cancer within the next 25 years, according to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, in New York, and Lund University, in Sweden. The findings, published today online in the British Medical Journal, could have important implications for determining which men should be screened after the age of 60 and which may not benefit substantially from continued prostate cancer screening.